Accueil Actualités Communiqués Politique Etrangère Evénements culturels La Grèce en France Grèce Xenios Médias Olympisme Contactez-nous

Explorer la Grèce

 

 

29/01/2010

(GNA)

 

Discovering Paenia Cave

Paeania Cave, which is located on the eastern side of Mount Hymettus, is a unique “tourist attraction” in Attica. The cave, also known as Koutouki Cave, is 2 million years old, comprising a precipice, sinking 38 meters into the ground with ascending and descending corridors extending for 350 metres. Its huge central chamber is richly decorated with stalagmites, stalactites, and pillars, creating an imposing image. The cave was accidentally discovered in 1928 and then a tunnel was dug into the rock to allow access. For trekkers, the cave can be reached on foot in about two-and-a-half hours from the Monastery of Kaisariani on the western side of Mt Hymettus and certainly, it won’t let down anyone.   

Athens Plus (15.01.2010): Paeania Cave

28/01/2010

(GNA)

 

The Smokovo Baths 

The Smokovo Baths - a state-of-the-art-spa centre in Karditsa, Thessaly prefecture, central Greece, have a centuries-long history and monastic tradition and today are of the best known therapeutic spa tourism locations in Greece, while the thermal waters' therapeutic properties have been known since antiquity.

With its five hot mineral springs in the traditional village of Smokovo (renamed Loutropigi), meaning spring source), Smokovo spa's thermal waters come from five springs, with a natural temperature of 37-40.2 C, and are channelled to the hydrotherapy facility.

The waters are considered ideal for arthritic and rheumatic disorders, chronic rheumatism, sciatica, neuralgia, muscle aches, ailments of the respiratory tract, gynaecological disorders and skin diseases.

The method of treatment is bathing and inhalation. Today, therapeutic tourism is an alternative form of tourism combining holidays with preservation of physical and mental well-being.

Athens News Agency: Smokovo Baths, a centuries-long history with a monastic tradition

08/01/2010

(GNA)

Ancient forest fraktos

The virgin forest of Fraktos, situated in the northeastern part of the Prefecture of Drama in northern Greece under the highest summit of central Rhodope Mountains, is the only old-growth forest in the country and among the most unique in Europe.

The Fraktos forest had been declared a military zone for years and was thus unaffected by human activity.

The woodland ecosystem - unaffected for at least 500 years - was registered as a virgin forest in 1979, and a year later was declared a protected monument of nature.

Fraktos is home to 100 species of birds and 32 species of mammals including several rare animal species in Greece and Europe.

Athens News Agency: Fraktos Forest, the only virgin forest in Greece

18/12/2009

(GNA)

 

Mani : Ravishnig and sublime 

The region of Mani -extending in the prefecture of Laconia and Messinia- is one of the most impressive landscapes of Greece.

Ravishing, wild and sublime, Mani, still today, calls to mind the bravery and courage of Greeks, a place where, according to legends, no enemy has set foot.

Mani is known for its unspoiled, almost "ascetic" natural environment, its traditional architecture with the renowned Mani tower-houses and its picturesque villages.

The village of Kardamili, whose name has remained unchanged since the time of Homer, Stoupa -the place where the famous Alexis Zorbas, the hero in Nikos Kazantzakis’ book actually lived- and the ancient village of Vathia with its majestic stone tower houses are some of the places that offer visitors the promise of wonderful experiences. 

The New York Review of Books: "Mani: Travels in the Southern Peloponnese" by Patrick Leigh Fermor 

27/11/2009

(GNA)

 

Winter destinations 

Evrytania, at the southern end of the Pindos mountain range, dubbed "Greece’s Switzerland" is a very popular destination during the winter months.

One may visit two well-known villages, Proussos, best known for its old monastery with the famous icon of Our Lady of Proussos and the Koryschades settlement which hosted the elected National Assembly, in May 1944, during the German occupation.

Meteora (meaning "suspended in the air") in the region of Thessaly, is known for the complex of 24 monasteries on the top of impressive rock towers, a strange but breathtaking landscape that has been sculpted by wind and water over thousands of years.

The site is included in the UNESCO World Heritage list

Trikala, at the foothills of Mt Koziakas, on the eastern side of the Pindos mountain range, is a mostly pedestrian’s town on the banks of river Lithaios.

One of the highlights of the town is the 16th century Kursum mosque, a protected UNESCO Heritage site, now used as an exhibition hall. Mt Koziakas and Acheloos river are part of the European Natura 2000 network of protected natural habitats.

AthensPlus (12.12.2008): Trikala, halfway to heaven 

26/11/2009

(GNA)

 

Travel log : Metsovo 

Metsovo is a traditional and picturesque town in Greece’s northeastern region of Epirus. Built at an altitude of 1,156 meters and surrounded by several summits of the Pindos mountain range, Metsovo is an attractive destination all year round.

Thanks to its great benefactors such as Baron Michael Tositsas and Evangelos Averoff, the town acquired an advanced public infrastructure, a timber processing factor, the first funicular railway and a cheese factory which produces the famous types of cheese, Metsovone and Metsovela.  

The influence of these important figures is also evident in the area’s culture. The Averoff Gallery has the second-largest collection of 19th and 20th century paintings after the National Gallery in Athens and its Museum of Folk Art is one of the most impressive in Epirus.

The unique architectural style of mansions with stone-wood roofs, cobblestone alleyways and old churches, make Metsovo an open-air museum, ready to be explored. 

Athens Plus (20.11.09): Metsovo, setting high standards 

Greek Mediterranean Gastronomy: Cities of Epirus; City of Metsovo: metsovo.gr

13/10/2009

(GNA)

 

Travelling to Saronic islands : Hydra 

Hydra, a glorious and cosmopolitan island, is the queen of the Saronic Gulf.

The idyllic horseshoe-port, the cobble- stone alleys, and the houses adorned with flowers give the island an air of exquisiteness and romance. The imposing mansions bear witness to the economic flourishing of the island at the end of the 18th century.

During the Independence War in 1821, Hydra played a key role in the Greek navy, as its fleet dominated the seas and "gave birth" to great admirals such as Andreas Miaoulis and Pavlos Kountouriotis.

On either side of the port, there are ramparts with canons, relics of that period.Vehicles are prohibited and pedestrians’ main mode of transportation is on donkeys. Much like a painting, with white and blue colours above the sea, Hydra is an island worth to be discovered.

06/10/2009

(GNA)

 

Travelling to Saronic islands : Spetses 

There are many opportunities to travel around Greece and enjoy the warm days of October.

Travelling to the Saronic islands may be an option as they are situated at a close distance from Athens and its port, Piraeus.

Scattered in the Saronic Gulf, these islands have remarkable history, outstanding natural beauty, clean sandy beaches and even small deserted islets to explore.

Spetses is the southernmost island of the group and lies at the entrance of the Argolic Gulf. Birthplace of the famous heroine Laskarina Bouboulina, Spetses played a key role during the Greek War of Independence, 1821.

On Spetses one can enjoy tranquility but also cosmopolitan life, picturesque small bays, interesting historical sites and a charming harbor.

Among its trademarks are its authentic villages, a capital considered an architectural jewel, and traditional horse buggies, as the use of vehicles is limited on the island.

23/09/2009

(GNA)

 

A house with important guests

Villa Galini, a magnificent 19th century Victorian villa on the island of Poros, on the Saronic Gulf, was the retreat of many noted writers and artists in its glorious history.

The 'Kokkino Spiti' (Red House), as it is known by the locals because of its crimson colour, enjoys a majestic view of the tranquil ("galini", in Greek,) lagoon between Poros and Galatas.

Built on the peak of a pine studded hill in 1894 and designed by one of the most prominent architects of the time, Anastasios Metaxas, Villa Galini was the family home of Amaryllis Dragoumi and was always brimming with friends, while the Greek statesman Eleftherios Venizelos was a guest there once.

Villa Galini was a favoured retreat of Giorgos Seferis, recipient of the 1963 Nobel Prize for Literature.

Other famous visitors include American author Henry Miller, who was a visitor just before WWII, author Lawrence Durell, the reclusive movie star Greta Garbo in her later years and painter Marc Chagall.

Strolling through the Nationl Garden

The National Garden in the heart of Athens is the best place to escape the hustle and bustle of the city.

Small ponds, narrow paths, huge palms, plenty of trees and flowers create an idyllic place, ready to welcome any visitor who wants to relax and feel like being in the countryside.

Commissioned by the first King of Modern Greece- Otto, around 1839, the National Garden is not only a place where one can enjoy a breath of fresh air but also a place that would make one’s walks spiritually invigorating as there are a lot of cultural elements inside the park: a children's library with two reading rooms and nearly 6,000 books, a small zoo and a botanical museum featuring a collection of specimens of the ornamental plants adorning the park.

18/09/2009

(GNA)

 

 

Music, mementos museum on Lefkada

A Museum of Music and other Mementos operates in the old city of Lefkada island, in the Ionian Sea, housing rare objects collected over the past 30 years. 

Some 50 phonographs as well as, gramophones, old vinyl music records, postcards and old photographs, swords, knives and guns, laternas (a variant of the barrel piano very popular in Greece in the late 19th and early 20th century), old bank notes, local embroideries and tools, used in professions that do not exist anymore or are close to being extinct, together with many other small treasures, take the visitors on a journey to times of old. The private museum was founded in 1990 and is the only one of its kind in Greece. 

18/09/2009

(GNA)

 

The glory of nature

The city of Drama - capital of the prefecture of the same name - is a beautiful town in northeastern Macedonia. With its excellent water resources and its green scenery beneath Mt Falakro, Drama is a place of unique natural beauty and long tradition.

Globally renowned for its International Film Festival, Drama offers its visitors hospitality and entertainment, serving also as a starting point for a wide range of trips to explore the rest of the prefecture. The villages of Mt Menikio, the Elatia Forest, the Nestos River, and the skiing center of Mt Falakro or the Aggitis Cave are some of the most beautiful and "untouched" places to visit and live exciting moments.  

Greek News Agenda: Rare Crayfish in Cave

09/09/2009

(GNA)

 

Archeology : Asklepios – an approchable god

The ancient sanctuary of Asklepios, - UNESCO World Heritage Site - is located in the peaceful coastal town of Epidaurus, with its mild climate. The sanctuary of the god-physician Asklepios was the most famous healing centre of the Greek and Roman world.

It is considered to be the birthplace of medicine and to have had more than 200 dependent spas in the eastern Mediterranean. Its monuments, true masterpieces of ancient Greek art, are a precious testimony to the practice of medicine in antiquity.

Most of its architecture dates from between 300 and 200 BC. The asklipieion was closed down and probably destroyed in the late 4th century AD.

It was excavated from the 1880s onwards by Panagis Kavvadias of the Archaeological Society at Athens. Asklepios was perhaps the most approachable of the ancient Greek gods. His sanctuaries were explicitly open to all visitors, including women and slaves. 

Athens News (7.08.2009) A god for simple folk (p. 33); See also: Athens-Epidaurus Festival 2009

08/09/2009

(GNA)

 

Wetlands of Lake Stymphalia 

Lake Stymphalia in the northeast Peloponnese is a well-known wetland of heightened ecological importance for the local region, one included in the European Union's Natura 2000 programme for the conservation of fauna and flora.

Stymphalia, located in Corinth prefecture, is the only mountainous lake in the Peloponnese, Greece’s southern-most province. Surrounded by Mt. Kyllini (or Zireia), Mt. Oligyrtos, Mt. Mavrovounio and Mt. Garrias, the wetland is rich in bird, amphibian and plant life, and is a very important refuge and breeding ground for migratory birds, including 133 species of protected fowl and birds threatened with extinction.

During the Roman era, the lake supplied water to ancient Corinth some 65 kilometres away through an aqueduct constructed during the reign of Emperor Hadrian.

Parts of the ancient aqueduct are still visible today. On its north shore lie the remnants of ancient Stymphalos. 

In Greek mythology, Lake Stymphalos is the site of Hercules' sixth labour, namely, to slay the man-eating Stymphalian birds (Stymphalides), pets of Aris, the god of war.

Athens News Agency: Preserving eponymous Lake Stymphalia; Natura 2000 Programme: Greece

04/09/2009

(GNA)

Alternative tourism : Diros caves 

The magnificent Diros Caves in Mani – in the Laconia prefecture - are a complex of three imposing caverns formed by an underground river located just 4 kilometres away from Diros village.

Paleolithic and Neolithic artifacts found in the caves indicate that the area constitutes one of the earliest inhabited places in Greece, and many of the artifacts are on display at the Diros Museum, situated at the entrance of the cave.

The caves feature beautiful formations of glistening stalagmites and stalactites of varying shapes and sizes, while the incredible colours and textures that have naturally developed over thousands of years by rain water penetrating the calcium carbonate in the rock are artfully highlighted by halogen lights.

Archaeological exploration of the caves has turned up important findings dating to the Paleolithic and Neolithic times, when the caves served as places of worship, and were thought to be one of the entrances to the Underworld.

Greek News Agenda: The Mani Region

30/07/2009

(Grèce hebdo)

 

 Le musée de Vergina  

On ne peut pas dire qu’ils sont inconnus, mais relativement peu de gens les ont visités : les tombeaux des rois de la Macédoine à Vergina, 80 km au sud-ouest de Thessalonique, aujourd’hui transformés en un musée impressionnant.

Les archéologues savaient depuis longtemps que les petites collines (tumuli) autour du village de Vergina devraient faire partie d'un cimetière d’Aigais, l’ancienne capitale de la Macédoine du 4e siècle av. J.-C. Mais c’était le professeur d'archéologie à l'Université de Thessalonique, Emmanuel Andronikos, qui a découvert les tombeaux royaux, durant ses travaux au Grand Tumulus, en 1977-78. L’un des tombeaux est probablement celui du roi Philippe II (382-336 av. J.-C.), le père d’Alexandre le Grand.

Les découvertes faites au Grand Tumulus sont d’une valeur inestimable. Le tombeau de Philippe mesure 9,50 x 5,50 m, présente une façade de la forme d'un temple dorique et est orné de triglyphes et de métopes. Au-dessus de la frise dorique, il y a une frise ionique avec la peinture d'une scène de chasse. Un autre tombeau est décoré avec une peinture présentant l’enlèvement de Perséphone. Ces deux peintures sont les seuls exemples de la peinture grecque antique, et sont probablement les travaux de Philoxenes et Nikomachos. Une grande quantité d’objets a été découverte, entre eux un coffre d’or (larnax) qui contenait les os du roi Philippe, enveloppés d'une étoffe d'or et de pourpre. Sur ses os était posée une couronne d’or, la plus impressionnante et la plus lourde de l’antiquité, composée de 318 feuilles et 68 glands. Le couvercle du larnax est décoré avec le soleil macédonien. On a découvert aussi l’armure de Philippe, avec un superbe bouclier d’or et d’ivoire.

Les tombeaux royaux et tous les objets découverts sont exposés sur place, dans le Grand Tumulus, aménagé en musée. C’est un musée petit mais très moderne, avec des objets uniques, d’une grande qualité. Mais c’est surtout l’atmosphère à l’intérieur qui impressionne.

29/07/2009

(GNA)

 

Evia is one of the most beautiful Greek islands and the second largest after Crete.

The island of Evia has a seahorse-shape and according to the myth, it was chipped off mainland Greece by a blow from Poseidon’s trident.

Chalkida is the capital of the island and it is built on both sides of the Strait of Euripus, one part on the island of Evia and the other on mainland Greece.

Northern Evia offers an ideal combination of verdurous woody mountainous environment with beaches of superlative beauty a unique destination, very different from other touristy areas of Greece. In the village of Papades, the visitor may enjoy a magnificent view of the Aegean and of Skiathos and Skopelos islands.

Loutra Edipsou is a well-known spa resort, famous since Roman times. Visitors from all over the world go there to take advantage of the therapeutic properties and the medicinal waters of Edipsos. 

Athens Plus: Northern Evia-Bridging the Divide (29.05.09, p.42) 

Nautilus Museum 

The "Nautilus Museum" located in the Edipsos region of Northern Evia features shells, fossils, rocks and other sea findings from around the region, acquired with care and great effort over the last 40 years.

The museum is open all year round ready to introduce visitors to some of the beauty and magic that the seas of the world are blessed with. 

Visitors have to opportunity to discover the many elements in the sea, whose properties have been studied by scientists and then applied to architecture, medicine, shipbuilding, engineering, textile industry and more, like the "brandaris" seashell, part of the murex family, which was the first medical tool (a dropper) used by Hippocrates.

24/07/2009

(GNA)

 

Cephalonia is the largest of the Ionian Islands and the country’s sixth largest overall. It is a mountainous island with a widely varied landscape, mixed flora, picturesque villages and magnificent beaches.

Argostoli, the capital of the island is situated inside a protected natural harbour in the gulf of the same name, while its center features many Venetian-style buildings and Lithostroto, a marbles-paved main street which ends in the bustling central Vallianou square.

In Cephalonia, the visitor will come across stunning beaches such as Myrtos –rated as one of the best beaches in the world, - sites of historical, religious and cultural interest as well as unique physical  phenomena such as the cave-lagoon Melissani (photo) and the national park of Mt Aenos which hosts a unique species of fir trees called "Abies Cephalonica."

Athens Plus: Cephalonia-Shaken, not Stirred (26.07.09 p.42)

23/07/2009

(GNA)

 

Folegandros is a welcoming small island in the Aegean that has led to the creation of its own fan club, as visitors keep coming, year after year, to meet friends from all over the world.

They report that they remain spellbound by its beauty and by the hospitality of its inhabitants who seem to consider visitors as honorary guests in a family reunion.

Every summer, at the beginning of July, the Municipality of Folegandros organises in association with the non-profit organisation Media dell' Arte the "Folegandros Festivities."

The Media dell’ Arte consists of artists and academics who have put together a cultural project called "Isolario" which aims at keeping the small Cycladic islands’ cultural heritage alive through various cultural activities which take place every year on the islands of Folegandros, Sikinos, Donousa, Amorgos and Kimolos.

23/07/2009

(GNA)

 

A natural wonder  

The waterfall of Trachoni or Livaditis in northeast Greece is a picturesque and almost mystical waterfall, as it is surrounded by myths and legends lost in the mists of time.

In fact, there is a dispute over the name of the waterfall between two neighbouring municipalities: the residents of Paranesti Municipality in Drama Perfecture call it Thrachoni, while the residents of Stavroupoli Municipality of the adjacent Prefecture of Xanthi call it Livaditis. 

Whatever the name is, Trahoni or Livaditis is a magnificent 40 meters high waterfall, the tallest one on the Rodopi Mountain Range in Thrace.

During the winter, when temperatures drop below zero, the landscape is spectacular with the waterfall turning into a huge ice sculpture.

You Tube: The Waterfall of Leivaditis-Xanthi-Greece (vidéo)

23/07/2009

(Grèce hebdo)

 

Le musée archéologique de Naxos 

L’île de Naxos est connue pour ses belles plages, l’ambiance de son port, les petites ruelles de l’ancienne ville qui mènent en hauteur, vers le ‘château’, qui est en réalité un petit village. Cependant, peu de personnes savent que son musée archéologique, qui se trouve dans la partie la plus pittoresque du ‘château’ est l’un des plus beaux petits musées de Grèce. Sa collection témoigne de la vie culturelle ininterrompue de Naxos depuis le troisième millénaire av.J.-C. jusqu’à la fin du monde antique. Surtout les collections cycladiques et Mycéniennes valent la peine d’une montée. Le musée de Naxos, situé dans une ancienne école, fondée par les jésuites en 1627, a la seconde plus grande collection en idoles cycladiques après le musée archéologique d’Athènes.

Naxos, grâce à ses ressources en eau et à sa terre fertile, a toujours été une île prospère. Le marbre, matériel présent en abondance, fournissait aux hommes du troisième millénaire av.J.-C. mais aussi à ceux qui ont suivi, le premier matériel de création artistique. On y trouve plusieurs objets, comme des vases ou des ustensiles. Mais ce sont les idoles cycladiques qui sont les plus impressionnantes car elles constituent la première expression de l’art plastique en Grèce. La collection de Naxos permet de suivre les efforts de l’homme pour illustrer la figure humaine. Certaines idoles sont tout à fait schématiques. Par la suite, on remarque la tentative de présenter le corps humain et les détails anatomiques de manière plus fidèle. Les variations et les évolutions que l’on observe d’une idole à l’autre indiquent la volonté de recherche et de création des sculpteurs de Naxos. Pour les amateurs de l’art cycladique, le musée de Naxos est un must. (Voir aussi ‘Naxos’, éditions Toubis.) Il y a une petite histoire autour des idoles cycladiques du musée de Naxos: Il y a trente ans, presque la totalité de celles-ci a été volée. La police a pu repérer le voleur et récupérer toutes les idoles, sauf une. Celle-ci a été découverte plus tard, en Hollande, dans les mains d’un nouveau propriétaire. Confronté à des problèmes juridiques et devant le risque de la perdre, l’état grec a acheté sa statue volée et l’a fait revenir en Grèce. Cette histoire est significative de l’importance du patrimoine culturel pour la Grèce.

22/07/2009

(GNA)

 

Koufonisia is a cluster of two islands, Kato (Lower) and Pano (Upper) Koufonisi that belongs to the complex of Small Cyclades.

Geographically, it is located on the southeast side of Naxos and on the west side of Amorgos.

Koufonisia also include the tiny, uninhabited island of Keros, which is a protected archaeological site from which a good number of ancient Cycladic art has been excavated in the 20th century. 

The main occupation of the locals is fishing, so Koufonisi is a true fish village where visitors may eat fish and seafood in abundance. 

It has one of the biggest fishing fleets in Greece. Its heavenly beaches - mostly sandy - are part of the magic of this picturesque island.

21/07/2009

(GNA)

 

Although unspoiled by mass tourism, Sikinos is anything but a tiny, forgotten island. On the contrary, it has opted for an alternative development.

It offers few, small beaches, while in the town of Hora, local architecture is exemplarily preserved. As a mode of transport, cars are not fit for Sikinos, so one must try riding donkeys, or just hiking.

Last but not least, residents of Sikinos contribute to the island’s magic: an active community, which has revived the old vineyards, has set up a beekeeping cooperative and even operates a recycling programme.

Kathimerini Daily: Sikinos opts for a different way to develop; TheGreektravel.com: Sikinos

20/07/2009

(GNA)

 

Alonissos : a home for rare species 

Many of Greece’s islands continue to provide shelter for some of the most precious species of the Mediterranean fauna and flora. At the Sporades complex of islands, off central Greece’s coast, lies Alonissos, an island, famous for the refuge it provides for the Mediterranean monk seal (monachus monachus).

Until recently, the island suffered a steady decline of population due to migration; however, the situation now is reversed thanks to the people’s willingness to preserve both the island’s popular tradition and wildlife.

The National Marine Park of Alonissos had a lot to do with the island’s revival. Being the first designated Marine Park in the country, it has now become the largest marine protected area in Europe. The park is open to visitors who wish to explore the island’s lush nature and approach areas –were permitted- for swimming, snorkelling and observation of the sea bed and wildlife, amateur photography and filming. 

Reading Greece : walking Crete 

A new book, titled "Hikes, Walks, and Rambles in Western Crete: A Guide" was recently published about exploring western Crete on foot.

The useful guide is written by Angelos Assariotakis and Yannis Kornaros and reflects their enthusiasm for the less-trodden paths of their native Crete and a practical approach to walking.

As dedicated mountaineers, the two authors have walked and scrambled every step of the paths they suggest in their guide. The guide includes small maps of each of the 51 suggested routes and information tables about the level of difficulty, the terrain, the duration, the availability of the water and other useful information for the lovers of trekking.

Athens Plus: A new guide to walking in western Crete (10.07.09)

17/07/2009

(Grèce hebdo)

 

Le patrimoine médiéval de Chios 

Chios est la 5eme plus grande île de Grèce, au nord-est de la mer Egée. Habitée dès l’époque néolithique, elle a connu un développement important au fil des siècles, grâce à sa position stratégique, mais aussi grâce à la production exclusive du célèbre mastic, une gomme à mâcher naturelle, unique dans le monde, qui a plusieurs vertus pharmaceutiques, cosmétiques et alimentaires. Au 14ème siècle, elle a été occupée par les Génois, qui ont laissé leurs traces dans son architecture. Actuellement, l’île possède plusieurs souvenirs de cette période médiévale. Au nord du port, le château génois de la capitale est l’un des complexes de défense médiévaux les mieux conservés dans la Méditerranée. De nombreux bâtiments et monuments de l’ère byzantine et ottomane se trouvent au sein de la citadelle. Au nord de l’ile, les villages Pyrghi, Mesta et Olympoi sont de très bons exemples d’architecture médiévale. Les villages ont été bâtis en forme de forteresse, pour se protéger contre les pirates. Leurs maisons se trouvent côte à côte, les portes et les fenêtres donnent sur l’intérieur, les ruelles sont pavées en pierre et au centre de chaque village se dresse un mirador. Dans les villages de Pyrghi et Lithi, le visiteur peut notamment admirer les ‘Xysta’ (photo), modèles géométriques en noir et blanc d’origine génoise, qui ornent les façades des maisons. Le voyage à Chios offre une expérience médiévale unique en Grèce.

09/07/2009

(Grèce hebdo)

 

Ano Syros, cité médiévale et cycladique 

Ano Syros est une ville médiévale construite en forme amphithéâtrale sur un rocher, dominée par l’église catholique médiévale de Saint Georges. Elle se situe au nord-ouest du chef-lieu actuel de l’île, Ermoupolis. Il s’agit de l’ancienne capitale de l’île de Syros, qui grâce à ses petites ruelles et ses maisons basses et au mélange de l’art cycladique et de l’art médiéval, garde encore tout son charme. La façon amphithéâtrale, dont elle est construite, s’explique du fait que la cité devait se mettre à l’abri des pirates. Une forteresse défensive était alors formée, une forteresse composée de petites maisons, collée l’une à l’autre. Les maisons ont été construites les unes contre les autres et sont entourées de pentes rocheuses formant une sorte de forteresse protectrice qui était particulièrement efficace contre les attaques des pirates et d’autres ennemis qui menaçaient l’île vers 1200, quand le village d’ Ano Syros a été construit. Selon les historiens, l’île de Syros, au 13ème siècle, devient propriété des Vénitiens de Naxos. Peu à peu, l’île sert comme refuge aux catholiques d’autres îles des Cyclades, qui étaient chassés par les Turcs. Ces refugiés se sont installés à Ano Syros et ont bâti une cité fortifiée. Au 16ème siècle, la France devient la protectrice de l’île et signe avec les ottomans un statut d’extraterritorialité pour l’île. Désormais, l’administration, la justice et l’éducation étaient l’affaire des moines français. L’île a donc commencé à s’évoluer et à prospérer. Sur le plus haut point, se trouve la cathédrale de Saint-Georges. Par là, le visiteur peut admirer la vue sur l’île et commencer une longue promenade dans les ruelles, en passant par des maisons peintes d’un blanc typiquement cycladique, des marches blanchies à la chaux, des balcons en bois fleuris, des portes en bois et des petites cours fleuries.

03/07/2009

(GNA)

 

Paros Island, one of the largest of the Cyclades, has a lot to offer its visitors.

Whether one prefers a quiet, peaceful holiday enjoying nature and traditional Greek atmosphere, or one is more of a party type, the island provides endless possibilities.

Paros features many beautiful sandy beaches; some are hidden, tiny little bays, enclosed by extraordinarily "sculptured" rocks ("Kolimbithres"- photo), while others are long and wide.

The countryside - with its terraced hills and magnificent rock formations, endless vineyards, olive groves and fruit trees - is overwhelming. There also exist many attractive villages in the traditional Cycladic style.

Their glowing white houses along labyrinth-wise streets, decorated with arches, pretty balconies, Greek pottery, bright flowers and fragrant herbs can make the visitor discover one postcard theme after another.

Visit the website of the Municipality of Paros Island 

02/07/2009

(GNA)

 

Nine geo-wonders on Pindos mountain 

The rocks of Deskati in north-western Greece’s prefecture of Grevena – a European Destination of Excellence -  have attracted the interest of geologists around the world as they tell the geological history of the earth and were the basis for the development of the tectonic plates theory.

Deskati and the greater region of Vounasa are among the nine geo-wonders in the Pindos Mountain Range that were the subject of a scientific conference held in the Prefecture of Grevena aimed at their promotion into tourist destinations. 

The rocks of Deskati were created 700 million years ago when the ancient super continent Pangaea (meaning "all earth" in Greek) broke up to form the European and African continents.

Later they were submerged into the Tethys Ocean that existed between the continents and united the region of today's Britain with China. 

The nine geo-wonders of Pindos include the heavily deformed limestone rocks at Mt Tsourgiakas and their small waterfalls, the gorge of Portitsa, the Pierced Rock formed as a result of erosion, Vasilitsa and its multicoloured rocks, the villages of Dotsiko and Mesolouri with their 30-million-year old coral reef and the village of Monachiti with its 50-meter wide vertical rocks.

Meanwhile, the Aliakmon River Gorge is currently being studied by scientists from the United States, the UK, Serbia, Italy and Greece in an intense effort to have its geological data recorded considering that by the end of the next decade it will be flooded as soon as the construction of the Public Power Corporation (DEI) "Ilarion" Dam is completed.  

02/07/2009

(Grèce hebdo)

 

Anafi : du temple d’Apollon au monastère de Zoodochos Pighi 

Au sud-est des Cyclades, à deux heures de bateau de Santorin, se trouve Anafi, une île que le développement touristique n’a pas encore touchée. (Voir Grèce Hebdo n.39 6-11-2008). A part son paysage exceptionnel, l‘île présente un intérêt historique. Chora, l’agglomération principale d’Anafi, avec presque 270 habitants, possède un style architectural typiquement cycladique. Construite pendant le Moyen-âge, à 260 mètres d’altitude, elle se distingue par ses maisons voûtées et ses ruelles sinueuses, qui mènent à une citadelle vénitienne, pleine de chapelles byzantines. Une cité antique a été probablement bâtie au 8ème siècle sur la colline de Kastelli, où des restes épars de son cimetière et ses remparts sont encore visibles. Le visiteur admirera aussi des vestiges romains disséminés un peu partout, comme le sarcophage impressionnant, à deux pas de l’église de Panaghia à Dokarchi. Bien qu’il s’agisse d’une île pleine de beauté naturelle, avec des plages superbes, son attraction naturelle unique est le rocher monolithique de Kalamos, qui avec celui de Gibraltar compte parmi les plus grands escarpements de la Méditerranée. Difficilement accessible, il abrite une flore rare, une église située au sommet, autrefois appartenant à l’ancien monastère de Kalamiotissa et offre un panorama magnifique. Un célèbre lieu de pèlerinage, le monastère de Zoodochos Pighi, est situé sur l’isthme qui sépare le cap de Kalamos du reste de l’île. Il a été bâti sur le site d’un ancien temple d’Apollon, actuellement préservé et incorporé dans l’enceinte du monastère. Un réseau de sentiers multiples, de 18km au total, offre la possibilité d’explorer l’île et de découvrir son intérêt historique, environnemental et culturel tout particulier.

30/06/2009

(GNA)

A grey landscape of rock, broken up here and there by a gleaming white chapel, is the first impression on visitors as the ferry draws into the harbour of the Cycladic island of Sifnos.

On a plateau six kilometres from the port, one encounters a unique view: the whole of the plateau is covered with sparkling white villages which virtually blend into one another.

The island was famous in ancient times for its wealth, which came from gold and silver mines and the quarries of Sifnos stone. It enjoyed great prosperity in classical times, as can be seen from its treasury, dedicated to Apollo at Delphi.                                                                       

More info: Travel to Sifnos www.travel-to-sifnos.com

26/06/2009

(GNA)

Corfu : an Ionian jewel

"Corfu town is Venice and Naples, a touch of France and more than a dash of England, apart of course from being Greek."

Countess Flamburiari who used these words to describe Corfu island was not the only one to be enticed by the beauties of this famous and much visited island off the West coast of Greece.

In 19th century, Empress Elisabeth of Austria expressed the desire to immerse herself in the Greek culture and in 1890, she commissioned the construction of a summer palace which she called the Achilleion, after Homer's hero Achilles. The palace, with the neoclassical Greek statues that surround it, is a monument to romanticism as well as escapism.

The various architectonic styles of its buildings, monuments and city planning are due to the island’s long history of conquerors. Venetians, British, French, Italians and Germans, all left their mark. The island’s city centre -the Old Town- is an historic complex of narrow streets dominated by the 16th century fortress.

Close to the capital lies a small island, home to a monastery, the white staircase of which resembles a (mouse) tail, thus the name of the island Pontikonissi (mouse island).

Corfu’s natural habitat is equally exquisite. The island has some of the Ionian Sea's most beautiful beaches, favoured by thousands of visitors.

UNESCO World Heritage: Old Town of Corfu is protected by UNESCO; You Tube: UNESCO Ceremony 

18/06/2009

(Grèce hebdo)

 

Andros, une île très spéciale 

L’île d’Andros est une île des Cyclades différente des autres. Grande, fertile et boisée, elle est riche en sources d’eau (comme la source Sariza) et même possède des cascades, phénomène unique dans les Cyclades. De plus, elle se distingue des autres îles grâce à son architecture traditionnelle et unique. Chez les grecs, Andros est connue comme le lieu d’origine de célèbres familles d'armateurs.

Dans l’Antiquité, elle était une île consacrée à Dionysos et réputée pour son vin. Des trouvailles archéologiques montrent qu’elle a connu une période de grande prospérité et des communautés développées dès l’époque minoenne y étaient créées. Le plus important site archéologique de l’île est Zagora, qui a connu son développement entre le 10e et le 8e siècle avant J.C. Ses remparts, des maisons, un temple et d’autres vestiges le classent parmi les sites de l’époque géométrique les plus impressionnants. L’ancienne capitale d’Andros était Palaiopolis, située près du port. Des trouvailles importantes dans la région, datant du 6e siècle avant notre ère, montrent qu’elle était une ville prospère pendant la période archaïque. Les remparts de l’ancienne cité, des vestiges de son agora (le centre), ainsi que deux nécropoles sont conservés. Le musée archéologique d'Andros expose des objets provenant des fouilles effectuées, comme la superbe statue d'Hermès d'Andros et le Torse d'Artémis, du 2ème siècle avant J.C. Un autre monument bien conservé d’Andros est la tour d’Aghios Petros, datant de l’époque hellénistique (4e -3e siècle avant J.C.). Située dans un endroit privilégié, donnant sur la mer, elle a été construite pour surveiller le port et l’île entière. Le visiteur peut également admirer le château de Faneromeni ou Pano Kastro, la ville la plus puissante de l’île au Moyen-âge. A une altitude de 600m, le château offre une vue spectaculaire sur la mer Egée. Andros est aussi pleine de monastères et églises byzantins remarquables, comme le monastère de Zoodohos Pighi.

Mais ce qui a fait l’île connue dans le monde de la culture et des arts est le célèbre musée d’art contemporain de la Fondation de Basil et Elise Goulandris, qui organise tous les étés des expositions uniques. Cette année, du 28 juin au 27 septembre, le musée présentera les oeuvres de Paul Delvaux, l’un de plus importants artistes belges du 20e siècle. L’exposition intitulée ‘Paul Delvaux et l’Antiquité’, comporte 60 oeuvres d’art provenant de différents musées et de la Fondation Paul Delvaux, qui montrent l’intérêt de l’artiste pour la Grèce et sa mythologie.

15/06/2009

(GNA)

 

A holiday in one of the six forest mountain villages developed by the Ministry of Agriculture may be an option for those who love nature and enjoy escaping from stressful urban life.

Integrated into the natural environment, each village contains 20 wooden houses, fully- equipped and ready to accommodate up to 80 guests.

The forest village of Erymanthos at the municipality of Stavroupolis in Xanthi, Kedros on the western slopes of Mt Tzoumerka, Livadaki on the eastern slopes of Mt Velouchi, Driades in Karditsa, Ano Doliana in Arcadia and Kapsitsa in Amfissa are the six forested villages which combine natural beauty and a serene environment.

More information: www.forestvillage.gr (in Greek)    

11/06/2009

(Grèce hebdo)

 

Falassarna, l’ancien port des pirates  

Situé à l’extrême ouest de la Crète, à 58km de la ville de la Canée et en face d’Elafonnisi (voir Grèce Hebdo no 16 du 240408), Falassarna est un petit village avec l’une de plus belles plages de sable fin de Grèce et d’une grande valeur archéologique. Bâtie dans le ‘cou’ de la péninsule de Gramvoussa, l’ancienne cité de Falassarna a été habitée dès l’ère Minoenne et a connu un développement considérable entre le 4e et le 1e siècle avant notre ère. La richesse de la région mais surtout son port l’ont transformée en un grand centre naval et commercial, qui même frappait sa propre pièce de monnaie. Le port était fermé et imprenable, entouré par des murs et relié à la mer par un canal. La position du port a fait de la cité un repaire de pirates à l’époque. Rome, dans un effort de combattre la piraterie, a finalement détruit Falassarna en 69 avant J.C. Depuis 1986 des fouilles sont effectuées dans la région du port. En dehors du port, dans le site archéologique, le visiteur peut admirer une nécropole avec 43 tombes et l’acropole de Falassarna. Une partie des remparts de la ville, composés de murs cyclopéens, de tours défensives, de bases de bâtiments et de vestiges de temples y est sauvegardée. Au sud de la péninsule, l’on trouve les vestiges d'un aqueduc romain. La trouvaille la plus célèbre de l’ancienne cité est un trône en pierre. Mais, selon une théorie, ce n’était pas un trône mais une tribune pour orateurs.

02/06/2009

(GNA)

 

The island of Samothraki in the North Aegean lies some 29 nautical miles southwest of the Thracian city of Alexandroupolis. Far from being a typical Greek island, it resembles a mountain surrounded by sea.

Its highest peak, Mount Fengari, rises to almost 1,700 metres. Samothraki is one of the truly virgin islands, where one can bathe in the shade of sycamore trees. Its singular mountain terrain, its abundance of crystal clear water, its archaeological finds along with an intangible mysticism that hovers in the air, offer the visitor an exotic holiday. 

To the north of the main town, Hora, is Paleopolis, the archaic and Hellenistic centre of the island, where there are still ruins of the Ancient City and the Sanctuary of the Great Gods.

This is where the Cabeiri Rites took place, mystical ceremonies of equal importance to the Eleusinian, probably aiming to secure life after death.

The island's most famous artistic treasure is the 2.5 metre marble statue of Nike, now known as the Winged Victory of Samothrace, dating from about 190 BC. It was discovered in pieces on the island in 1863 and is now displayed in the Louvre museum in Paris.

28/05/2009

(Grèce hebdo)

 

Les monastères de la rivière Loussios 

Le voyage en Arcadie, au centre du Péloponnèse, dévoile une région d’importance historique, religieuse et environnementale, peu connue. D’une beauté naturelle unique, l’Arcadie est remarquable pour les gorges de la rivière Loussios, ainsi que pour ses villes historiques Dimitsana et Karitaina. Dotées d’une variété de faune et flore rares, et de tranquillité due à la relative difficulté d'accès, les gorges ont favorisé le développement de la vie monastique au fil des siècles. Les monastères de Loussios accrochés aux roches et les nombreux ermitages, chapelles et églises, constituent des monuments impressionnants de la vie des moines orthodoxes. La région a été classée comme espace archéologique par le Ministère de la culture, en 1997. Le monastère Philosophou, fondé en 963, est le plus connu. Il a servi comme «école sécrète» pendant l’occupation ottomane, pour préserver la langue grecque et la foi orthodoxe. On y trouve, de rares icônes et fresques du 17e siècle. Le monastère Prodromou, probablement fondé au 16e siècle, est actuellement le plus grand monastère de Loussios, avec quelques 14 moines. Presque invisible, littéralement accroché à la paroi de la roche, il a été utilisé comme hôpital pendant la révolution grecque. Quant au monastère Aimialon, construit en 1608, il possède des hagiographies byzantines bien préservées.

Notons que l'impétueuse rivière Loussios et ses nombreux ruisseaux ont été la source de la prospérité de la région au 18e siècle, quand l'activité économique tournait autour de l'hydraulique. Les moulins à eau servaient, entre autres, pour produire la poudre à feu, alimentant la révolution nationale de 1821. Aujourd’hui, un musée hydraulique, situé à la ville de Dimitsana fait revivre quelques un des ces moulins.

22/05/2009

(GNA)

 

Monemvasia, a jewel in the Myrtoan sea 

Located in the southeastern Peloponnese in the prefecture of Laconiaa, Monemvasia is a castle-city of unique beauty, standing on a rock in the Myrtoan Sea.

Homeland of Yiannis Ritsos, Monemvasia takes its name from a narrow piece of land ("the bridge"), which joins the rock of Monemvasia with the mainland, creating thus the one and the only entrance to it. Within its castle, there is a whole medieval city, living on the rhythm of today, but with a magical ambience of the past

Just like it is about to break the bond with the earth and set sail in the blue sea, Monemvasia enchants every visitor with its unbeatable combination of natural beauty and cultural heritage. 

20/05/2009

(GNA)

 

“Citrus fruits” museum on Chios 

A unique museum of citrus fruits is located on the island of Chios, known as "Citrus Memories." One of three museums of its kind in the world, the "Citrus Memories" is actually a gallery which has several departments, highlighting cultivation, harvesting and trading of citrus fruits on the island of Chios since 1500. Established in 2008, the museum is located in Kampos - an area full of orchards - at the centre of the i sland. 

 Region of North Aegean: Prefecture of Chios

15/05/2009

(Grèce hebdo)

Anticythère, le nid de pirates

Anticythère, située entre la Crète et l’île de Cythère, est une petite île grecque du sud-est de Péloponnèse. Avec presque 45 habitants, l’île est la deuxième communauté la moins peuplée de la Grèce. Dans l’antiquité, elle était connue sous le nom de Aigila ou Ogylos. Il y a des indices que l’île était déjà habitée pendant les époques préhistorique et minoenne.

Entre le 4ème et le 1er siècle avant J.-C., Anticythère était employée comme base par un groupe de pirates. Les fortifications de leur ville sur une falaise au Nord-Est de l'île, sont préservées en relativement bonne condition. Au Moyen Age le Vénitiens y ont bâti un château. Derrière les anciennes fortifications, des maisons, des installations auxiliaires ainsi que des routes anciennes et sentiers attendent leur découverte complète. Dans la même région, on trouve, aussi, un ‘néosoikos’ (endroit ou bâtiment couvert dans lequel des bateaux de pirates ont été déposés pendant les mois d'hiver) et un secteur souterrain pour les rites sacrés et de sépulture. Entre 1423 et 1782, l’île a été désertée. Des habitants ont dû venir sur l’île au 18ème et au 19ème siècle de la région de Kissamos et de Sfakia de Crète.

Notons qu’Anticythère est une escale, très importante, pour les oiseaux migrateurs.

11/05/2009

(GNA)

 

Trekking : Cretan routes 

Crete is a large island, which combines snow-capped mountains, rolling hills covered with olive trees and over 1000 km of varied coastline with astonishing beaches

By going off the beaten track, trekkers discover the rugged splendour of the south-western part of the island behind the Lefka Ori (White Mountains). The village of Paleochora, a resort perched on a peninsula, is the starting point of a beautiful coastal route leading to a lush, green region built on the remains of ancient Lissos.

The route passes through a small gorge and ends in Sougia, a settlement located on the site of ancient Syia. Along their route from Paleochora to Sfakia, trekkers come upon some of the most impressive sections of the E4 European path as it moves along the steep slopes of Lefka Ori and offers a view to the Libyan Sea. 

The total length of the E4 European path is 6,300 km of which 1,600 km belong to Greece.

Agrotravel routes: Palaeochora to Sougia Map; Weather: Current Conditions at Paleochora; Agrotravel directories: Paths in Greece-Crete; West Crete webguide: www.west-crete.com

07/05/2009

(GNA)

Nikopolis: The City of Victory 

Nikopolis (Greek for "city of victory") is an ancient city in western Greece. It was founded by the Roman Emperor Augustus to commemorate his naval victory in Actium against Mark Antony and the Queen of Egypt, Cleopatra in 31 BC.

Its strategic location at the edge of a gulf in the Ionian Sea made it an ideal place for the Romans to impose their dominance in the region. Nikopolis quickly became a commercial, port city, as well as an important religious capital, favoured by the emperor who had granted the city freedom and privileges. Augustus also established the "Actian" athletic games, and honoured the God of light, Apollo

The 8th century marks the beginning of the city’s decline. First it was looted by Arabs and Bulgarians and was finally destroyed in the late 11th century. It was only in the beginning of the 20th century that the city saw the sun’s light again when it was revealed through archaeological excavations. Among the sites excavated we find walls dating back to the Roman era, a theatre and an Odeon, baths, an aqueduct and a Roman house, all restored. Visitors can also admire a variety of findings in the local museum of Nikopolis

07/05/2009

(Grèce hebdo)

Les 'maisons des dragons' en Eubée 

Dispersées dans différentes parties de l’île d’Eubée, les ‘‘maisons des dragons’’ constituent d’anciens monuments parmi les plus intéressants et -en même temps- inexplicables du pays.

Il s’agit de 23 constructions rectangulaires ou carrées en pierre, qui constituent, sans doute, les meilleurs exemples de l’architecture mégalithique en Grèce. On ne peut préciser ni la période exacte de leur construction – entre le 6ème et le 2ème siècle avant notre ère- ni le peuple qui les a bâties, ou leur utilisation. De plus, les "maisons" impressionnent par leur forme originale, la grande taille des pierres utilisées et leur technique de construction précise et élaborée. De ces faits dérive le mystère qui les entoure et le mythe local qui les veut avoir été habitées par des dragons.

Ces monuments sont caractérisés par des traits communs. Tous situés en hauteur, dans des endroits isolés, ils sont construits d’énormes pièces de schiste. Le bâtiment le mieux préservé se trouve au sommet de la montagne Ochis, au nord de l’île et a été utilisé comme temple en l’honneur du Zeus. Certaines de ces ‘‘maisons’’ sont supposées avoir été bâties par des travailleurs immigrés des carrières de marbre voisines, à la fin de l’époque hellénistique. Plusieurs objets datant de l’ère hellénistique et romaine ont été trouvés pendant les fouilles effectuées.

06/05/2009

(GNA)

Live Longer… on Ikaria 

People on the Greek island of Ikaria live longer than in just about any other place in the world.

A recent study of 90-year-old siblings, conducted by the National Hellenic Research Foundation, discovered 10 times more 90-year-old brothers and sisters there than the European average.

"Do these people possess the true secret to longevity? We're not sure yet, but we'll certainly distil a few clues about living longer, better", writes Dan Buettner in his commentary for the CNN,  while "The Blue Zones" expedition he’s leading - a team of the world's best demographers, physicians, medical researchers and media specialists- explores Ikarian longevity.  

See also: The Daily Express - The Secrets of Eternity Island 

Bird Watching… on Lesvos 

The island of Lesvos in the northeastern Aegean is home to 325 bird species and for this reason it is described as the "premier birding destination within the Mediterranean basin."

 The island’s rural municipality of Evergetoulas is a popular destination for birders from all over the world, especially during spring and autumn when there is bird movement.

 The gulf of Kalloni is part of “Natura 2000” Network and constitutes an excellent shelter and breeding area for rare and protected species of birds, including flamingos and storks. In Kalloni’s marshlands, from elevated sheltered watchtowers, birdwatchers can enjoy a really impressive spectacle.   

Bird watching tours in Greece: www.greecebirdtours.gr; Hellenic Ornithological Society: www.ornithologiki.gr; Greek News Agenda: Bird Watching in Antikythira 

09/04/2009

(Grèce hebdo)

 

Nikopolis, ‘‘la cité de la victoire’’ 

Nikopolis (en grec la ‘‘cité de la victoire’’) est une ville antique au nord de Préveza à l’ouest de la Grèce. Elle a été fondée par l’empereur romain Auguste pour commémorer sa victoire navale d'Actium contre Marc Antoine et la reine d’Egypte, Cléopâtre, en 31 avant J.C.

Stratégiquement située sur une presque île, à l’embouchure du golfe ambracique, dans la mer Ionienne, c’était un lieu idéal pour que les Romains imposent leur domination dans la région. Nikopolis est vite devenue un centre commercial et portuaire important ainsi qu’une capitale religieuse, comme l’empereur lui avait accordé des libertés et des privilèges. Auguste y a fait construire des bâtiments impressionnants et a aussi réorganisé les Actia, les jeux athlétiques et musicaux locaux en l’honneur d’Apollon. Son développement a continué et elle est devenue capitale de la région d’Epire, en 293 après J.C. Cependant, après le 8e siècle c’est la période de déclin, comme elle à subit des attaques et des pillages des Arabes et des Bulgares et elle a été finalement détruite à la fin du 11e siècle.

Des travaux archéologiques à la cité antique se sont effectués dès le début du 20e siècle. Parmi les sites que les fouilles ont fait découvrir, les remparts de l’époque romaine, le théâtre et l’odéon de la ville, où se tenaient les concours, ainsi que les thermes, l’aqueduc et une maison romaine, tous restaurés. Le visiteur peut aussi admirer une variété de trouvailles au musée de Nikopolis.

Située à 6 km de la capitale de la préfecture de Préveza, la cité antique est aussi un endroit d’une grande beauté naturelle.

03/04/2009

(Grèce hebdo)

 

La Rotonde de Thessalonique 

Depuis sa fondation en 315 av. J.-C. par le roi Cassandre, beau-frère d’Alexandre le Grand, Thessalonique a toujours été une grande ville. Ses monuments témoignent de son histoire.

Un des monuments exceptionnels de la ville est l’église d’Agios Georgios, dite la Rotonde, un des plus vieux bâtiments du monde, appartenant au patrimoine mondial de l’UNESCO.

C’est une construction circulaire et massive, bâtie vers 300 après J.C. Dans un premier temps, la Rotonde fut un temple romain, consacré à Zeus et construit par César Galerius, presque aussi vieux que le Panthéon à Rome. L’empereur Thedosius l’a transformé en église et pendant 1100 ans, la Rotonde fut la cathédrale de Thessalonique. Avec l’occupation ottomane, l’église a été convertie en mosquée. C’est à ce moment qu’un minaret y a été ajouté.

Le bâtiment a un diamètre de 24,5 mètres et d’ une hauteur de 30 mètres. Son dôme est supporté par des murs de plus de 6 mètres d’épaisseur. Les visiteurs peuvent admirer les marbres, et surtout les mosaïques qui ornent les murs internes. Les mosaïques de la Rotonde sont d’une finesse et d’une iconographie singulière et sont de grands chefs d’oeuvre de l’art paléochrétien. Leur origine est incertaine. Sur la coupole, l’on trouve une mosaïque avec quinze portraits de martyrs. Ce sont des portraits individualisés, différenciés par âge, chevelure, traits physionomiques, couleurs. De plus, les couleurs utilisées révèlent l’intention de l’artiste de donner la priorité à une esthétique de lumière colorée, qui a permis de représenter une beauté idéalisée des hommes saints dans l’au-delà. La Rotonde est un monument à ne pas rater lors d’une visite à Thessalonique. Ouverture du mardi au samedi et entrée gratuite.

01/04/2009

(GNA)

Poliochni: Prehistoric Urbanism 

Poliochni is the most important archaeological site on the island Lemnos in the northeast Aegean Sea. Several cities were built one on top of the other, and as a result, Poliochni is basically the cluster of seven successive layers of these cities dating back to the Final Neolithic period, (4 millennia before Christ and a millennium before Troy). 

What is impressive about Poliochni is the fact that it boasted a "Vouleuterion," a forum of discussion for the residents and a precursor of today’s institution of Parliament. 

Experts at the Italian Archaeological School in Athens -which has taken up excavations in Poliochni since the ‘30s- consider the "Vouleuterion" to be a testimony to the oldest democracy in Europe. It appears that the rapid growth of the city had turned it into a real urban centre. In its booming years, the city flourished in maritime trade, agriculture, fisheries, textiles and even small stone tools and weapons’ manufacture. 

Poliochni continued to thrive even through the early Bronze period and survived until the 2nd millennium BC, when it was abandoned due to a devastating earthquake. 

Macedonian Heritage: Ancient Pella; See also: Macedonian Heritage, An online Review of the Affairs, History and Culture of Macedonia

27/03/2009

(Grèce hebdo)

 

Le Sanctuaire des Grands Dieux 

Un des sites archéologiques les plus importants de Grèce se trouve sur la belle et lointaine île de Samothrace, au nord-est de la mer Egée, qui, pendant l’antiquité, était réputée pour le temple des Cabires, célèbre pour son culte à mystères. Les Mystères Cabiriques, contrairement à ceux d’Éleusine, permettaient la participation de tous les citoyens, et même des esclaves. L’objectif de ces Mystères était la poursuite de l’auto conscience à travers une expérience divine.

Au nord de l’île, on trouve les impressionnantes ruines de Palaiochora, la vieille ville, qui était entourée d’une muraille en pierres. Une des portes de la muraille, que les visiteurs peuvent encore admirer, menait au Sanctuaire des Grands Dieux. Les Grands Dieux étaient différents des 12 dieux olympiques, mais avaient quelques points communs avec eux. Aux alentours du temple, on trouve la Propylée de Ptolemaios et le Palais. A côté du Palais, on note la voûte d’Arsinoé qui date du 3ème siècle av. J-C. et qui constitue le plus grand bâtiment couvert de forme circulaire de l’antiquité. Une de plus importantes trouvailles de l’île est la Victoire de Samothrace, découverte en 1863 et transportée au musée du Louvre. Selon les historiens, la statue en marbre a été offerte vers 190 av. J-C. au temple de Cabires, de la part de la flotte de Rhodes, pour leur victoire contre Antiochos III, dit le Mégas.

19/03/2009

(Grèce hebdo)

 

La 1ère Assemblée d’Europe, à Poliochni, Lemnos  

Poliochni est un site archéologique important, situé à l’est de l'île de Lemnos, au nord-est de la Mer Egée. On y trouve sept villes successives dont la plus ancienne date de l’époque néolithique, vers 3700 avant J.-C. L’emplacement stratégique, entre la côte Ionienne et la mer Egée, a contribué à ce que le commerce maritime, et notamment le commerce du métal, s’épanouisse. Au début de l'âge du bronze, entre 2700 et 2400 avant J.-C., Poliochni a connu un fort développement - à son apogée la ville avait 1500 habitants - avant d’être abandonnée vers 2200-2100 av. J.C., après un tremblement de terre désastreux.

Dans les années 1930, l'école italienne Archéologique d’ Athènes a commencé des fouilles à Poliochni. Depuis, des découvertes intéressantes ont été mises en lumière. On y trouve des murailles, des bâtiments publics, des places publiques, des rues pavées avec des égouts, des puits, et de petites maisons en pierre. Notons que l’école archéologique italienne a découvert le ‘Vouleftirion’, l’Assemblée de Poliochni, un lieu où se réunissait l’élite de la ville, qui était responsable de son bon fonctionnement. D’après les archéologues italiennes, ce ‘Vouleftirion’ est la preuve que Poliochni était de la plus ancienne démocratie d’Europe.

13/03/2009

(Grèce hebdo)

 

Koufonissi, ‘île de Pourpre’ ou ‘la petite Délos’ 

Koufonissi, connu dès l’antiquité sous le nom de Lefki (la Blanche), est une petite île de la Mer Libyenne, au sud-est de la Crète, appartenant à la préfecture de Lassithi. L'île a été habitée dès le début de la civilisation minoenne (2700-1200 avant J.C.) et était un centre culturel et économique important. Son développement a été interrompu au 4ième siècle après J.C., quand elle a été dépeuplée, dans des conditions inconnues. Selon Aristote et Pline, Lefki était un centre important de la pêche aux éponges et de la fabrication de la teinture pourpre, tirée du Murex Trunculus, un gastéropode. La morphologie du terrain y a favorisé la culture du blé et de l’élevage. Située stratégiquement au sud-est de Crête, l’île jouait aussi un rôle militaire important.

On ne s’y attend pas, mais cette petite île de sable, où l’on va pour une baignade, est pleine d’antiquités. C’est au fond une ‘petite Délos’. Les interventions minimes sur Koufonissi, qui reste inhabitée, ont offert aux antiquités la possibilité de rester intactes. Les excavations commencées au nord-est de l'île ont abouti à la découverte d’importants monuments, donc un ancien théâtre de 1000 places en pierre, une ancienne villa romaine, un temple et une ancienne citerne.

A la valeur archéologique de Koufonissi, il faut ajouter sa beauté naturelle. L’île, un des sites constituant le réseau écologique européen ‘Natura 2000’ , est appréciée pour sa variété de faune et flore et constitue une destination touristique extraordinaire. Pendant les mois d’été, le visiteur peut y accéder en bateau du port de Makriyalos à Ierapetra, Crète.

05/03/2009

(Grèce hebdo)

 

Némée mythique 

Némée, un site antique grec situé au nord-est du Péloponnèse, dans la région de Corinthe, est réputé dans la mythologie grecque comme le lieu où Héraclès a tué le lion de Némée. Dans l’antiquité, la ville accueillait les Jeux Néméens, qui étaient célébrés, depuis 573 av. J.-C., dans le sanctuaire de Zeus. Selon un mythe, les Jeux ont été fondés par Héraclès lui même, à la suite de la mort du lion mythique.

Les visiteurs qui se rendent aujourd’hui à Némée, peuvent admirer le temple de Zeus, qui date de 330 av. J.-C., et le stade, qui se trouve à 400 mètres environ du temple et –selon les estimations- a eu une capacité de 40.000 spectateurs. [Pour les excavations voir http://www.nemea.org]

A proximité, se trouve le musée archéologique de Némée, inauguré en 1984, qui accueille une collection des objets historiques et préhistoriques, comme des monnaies, des poteries, des outils et des armes.

La ville moderne de Némée avec presque 4300 habitants, se trouve à quelques kilomètres à l’ouest du site archéologique. Elle est plutôt connue par ses vins. Le cépage local ‘Agiorgitiko’, permet la production des vins rouges d’une renommée mondiale.

26/02/2009

(Grèce hebdo)

 

Messène, la cité des Hilotes 

Un des plus beaux et des plus grands monuments classiques de Grèce est l’ancienne Messène, située en Messénie, dans le sud-ouest du Péloponnèse. Ses habitants étaient les Hilotes, mieux connus comme les esclaves des Spartiates, auxquels ils étaient soumis, avant d’être libérés par le général thébain Epaminondas, en 369 av. J.C. La cité de Messène est célèbre pour sa muraille, d’une longueur de 9km, dont la partie nord-ouest est la mieux conservée. Comme la ville elle-même, la muraille doit être construite vers 369 av. J.C. Là, on trouve la porte monumentale d’Arcadie, d’une forme circulaire, pourvue d’une cour intérieure ovale. Un chemin pavé menait jusqu’au marché de la ville. À l'extérieur de la porte on trouve les restes de plusieurs grands monuments funéraires.

Les visiteurs peuvent aussi se rendre au musée de Messène, ainsi qu’aux autres monuments du site archéologique comme le magnifique Asclépiéion, un temple de périptère dorique, le stade et le théâtre. L’accès à la cité de Messène est facile pour les visiteurs, même si les excavations et les travaux d'entretien et de restauration continuent jusqu'à aujourd'hui.

La ville moderne de Messène, compte environ 11000 habitants.

24/02/2009

(GNA)

 

Evros – a hidden paradise 

The Evros prefecture - located in Greece’s north-eastern corner - is one of the country’s largest districts. It is known for its wealth of natural, environmental and historical attractions.

Alexandroupoli, the port capital of the prefecture serves as the tourist gateway to the area. The bustling city takes its name from King Alexander of Greece and has the country’s biggest landmark lighthouse on the seaside promenade. Remarkable attractions of the district include the Evros river delta, an important international wetland, and the Dadia Forest, a sanctuary for rare and unique birds of prey in Europe. Soufli is known as the town of silk, thanks to the silk industry that flourished there in the 19th century. The Soufli Silk Museum displays exhibits related to the production of silk and also offers the opportunityto gain insight into the history of the town. 

Athens Plus: Evros, Life on the river’s edge (20.02.2009, p. 42)

06/02/2009

(GNA)

 

The Pieria prefecture, southwest of Thessaloniki in Macedonia, is the epitome of the Hellenic landscape – a perfect combination of mountain and sea, hosting not only the country’s highest summit, Mytikas (2,917 meters), on legendary Mount of Gods Olympus (or Olympos), but also its longest stretch of beach. 

The area - besides its irresistible allure for mountain lovers- presents considerable archaeological interest, and is therefore suitable for breaks and vacations throughout the year. The castle of Platamonas in the south and the sprawling archaeological site of the ancient Macedonian town, Dion, carry great historical appeal. The prefecture’s capital, Katerini, is one of Greece’s newest towns. Established at the end of 19th century by repatriated Greeks from the area of the Monastery of St Catherine on Mount Sinai in Egypt, Katerini is today a modern urban centre with exceptional quality of life. 

Athens Plus (January 23): Pieria, in the shadow of the Gods (23.01.2009, p.42)  

28/01/2009

(GNA)

On horseback 

Lefkos Pigassos (www.white-pegasus.com), a company based in the village of Papigo, one of the 46 villages of Zagorochoria, offers visitors the chance to get acquainted with some of the most beautiful regions of Epirus, Northern Greece, through organized horseback expeditions.

Papigo is at the heart of the National Park of the Northern Pindos Mountain range. It can serve as a starting point for horseback exploration trips to one of the most beautiful parts of Pindos, including Drakolimni Lake. 

18/12/2008

(Grèce hebdo)

 

Le village historique d’Ambelakia 

En face de l’Olympe se trouve la montagne verte de Kissavos. Là, entre  la Thessalie et la Macédoine, à 5 km des gorges de Tempi et à 450 m. d’altitude, se situe, un peu isolé, le village historique d’Ambelakia (ou Abelakia).

Ambelakia a connu une grande prospérité dans le passé. Au 18ème siècle le village était fameux dans toute l’Europe par la fabrication et la teinture de fibres textiles. Cette prospérité s’est transformé en de belles maisons, bibliothèques, fontaines, rues bien pavées. Tout ceci est toujours bien gardé, intégré dans l’un des plus beaux paysages de la Grèce. Ambelakia vaut certainement un détour et au moins un repas dans un de ses restaurants de la place centrale. Mais on peut aussi rester dans l’un de ses hôtels, se promener dans la montagne, explorer les gorges de Tempi, ou même aller à la mer.

Si vous faites Athènes – Thessalonique en voiture, n’oubliez pas de faire un petit détour pour visiter Ambelakia. Peut- être que vous décideriez d’y rester.

Infos : ‘Ambelakia’ ou ‘Abelakia’. En grec voir Agrotravel /Ambelakia et Kathimerini /Ambelakia.  

12/12/2008

(Grèce hebdo)

 

Gytheion, le port ancien et moderne de Sparte 

La ville de Gytheion, capitale de la région de Mani au sud du Péloponnèse, dans le golf de Laconia, a toujours été le port de la région. Dans l’antiquité c’était le port de Sparte. Aujourd’hui Gytheion est une ville provinciale vivante, située dans un endroit pittoresque où, selon le poète Homère, le troyen Pâris s’est réfugié avec la belle Hellène, l’épouse du roi de Sparte, Ménélas. La région est montagneuse, parsemée de plantations d’oliviers, avec des sites archéologiques, à  visiter, comme les ruines de l’ancienne ville et l’ancien théâtre daté de l’époque romaine. L’architecture typique de Mani est bien préservée dans la région l’on trouve des forteresses, des maisons-tours et des ruelles pavées en pleine harmonie avec la région qui est aride et sauvage. Le visiteur aura aussi l´occasion de jouir des plages de la région et de se servir de Gytheion comme d’une base pour faire des excursions aux alentours et notamment à Mistra, à la grotte de Diros, à Aréopolis etc.

04/12/2008

(Grèce hebdo)

 

Syros, la capitale des Cyclades et son  histoire glorieuse 

L’île de Syros, située exactement au milieu des Cyclades est le centre administratif et culturel de l’archipel. Elle a vécu de grands moments de gloire à l’époque où elle fut le centre culturel et commercial de toute la Grèce au 19eme siècle, grâce à son port Ermoupolis, qui est toujours la capitale des Cyclades. A l’époque, Syros était le centre de l’industrie navale de Grèce avec une économie florissante. Cette prospérité est encore visible grâce aux grands bâtiments néoclassiques, construits par des fameux architectes européens, comme le bavarois Ernst Ziller. Le Théâtre Apollon, une réplique de La Scala de Milan et premier opéra de Grèce, est érigé en 1864 par l’architecte français Chabeau. Construite en amphithéâtre, entre deux collines qui se font face, la capitale de l’île, Ermoupolis, est fière de sa colline ‘Ano Syros’, un endroit où habitait la communauté catholique de l’île, qui présente une architecture médiévale bien préservée. D’ailleurs, partout dans Syros, des villages pittoresques combinent l’architecture médiévale avec l’architecture typique des Cyclades créant  un mélange unique. Les visiteurs qui admireront cette île cosmopolite et socialement active pourront aussi découvrir ses belles plages et ses villages pittoresques et authentiques

27/11/2008

(Grèce hebdo)

 

Réthymnon, ville crétoise aux couleurs du passé  

Située au nord-ouest de la Crète, Réthymnon est une des principales villes de cette île et se trouve entre la préfecture de Canée et d’Héraklion. Réthymnon est une ville charmante, préservant de nombreux éléments d’architecture vénitienne et ottomane, traces des invasions du passé, qu’on découvre facilement en se promenant  dans les ruelles étroites du vieux quartier. Des piazzas décorées de superbes fontaines, des mosquées, des belles églises et des palais, mais surtout le vieux port et la forteresse vénitienne “fortezza” comptent parmi les monuments les plus caractéristiques de cette ville, restée intacte depuis la Renaissance. Mais la région de Réthymnon est également connue pour ses beautés naturelles, combinant des plages idylliques et des criques aux eaux de cristal avec de hautes montagnes qui cachent des gorges impressionnantes et des villages pittoresques. N’oubliez pas de goûter la fameuse cuisine crétoise, réputée pour ses saveurs  méditerranéennes  uniques.

20/11/2008

(Grèce hebdo)

 

Découvrant le lac Plastira, “la Suisse de Grèce 

À l’ouest de la Grèce, sur le chemin des Météores, se trouve le lac Plastira. Ce coin pure et calme, loin des courants du tourisme de masse et entouré par les montagnes Agrafa a émergé après la construction en 1959 d’un barrage qui a crée un lac artificiel. Le barrage et le lac ont eu le nom de Nikolaos Plastiras en honneur d’un général et premier ministre grec qui a conçu l´idée de ce barrage pour l´irrigation et l´électrification de la région en 1925. Le lac grâce a sa beauté naturelle exceptionnelle est devenu une destination touristique très intéressante, un vrai paradis des amateurs de nature et de sports (marche, équitation, pêche, ski, VTT, etc.) avec des infrastructures écologiques. Le barrage et le lac ont transformé la région, autrefois une des plus pauvres et des plus isolées de Grèce, en une splendide région touristique.

13/11/2008

(Grèce hebdo)

 

Sikinos, lointaine et inconnue 

Sikinos se situe dans la partie sud des Cyclades, entre Folegandros et Ios. La distance du Pirée (ou Lavrion) est 110 de miles nautiques, ce qui fait entre 8 et 12 heures de bateau. Lointaine et relativement inconnue, cette petite île de 41 km² et 250 habitants, garde tout le charme des Cyclades. Ici dominent la pierre, la lumière et le bleu infini de la mer. Il n’y a que deux agglomérations: Allopronoia, qui est le port, et Chora, la capitale, à l’interieur, à 270 m d’altitude. Sikinos, habitée depuis les temps  préhistoriques, était une île fertile, connue pour son bon vin, ce qui explique son deuxième nom, ‘Oinoe’ (Oinos=vin). Aujourd’hui, en essayant de préserver le caractère de l’île, la communauté locale mise sur  le développement durable, le tourisme alternatif et l’établissement d’infrastructures modernes.

Sikinos est une île ou la vie est simple, les habitants hospitaliers, les petites plages belles et les chemins dans la nature bien préservés. Si vous aimez être loin de la foule et vous n’êtes pas pressé, Sikinos est une destination à considérer.

Infos : le site Web de la communauté de Sikinos est simple et efficace (en grec ou anglais) ; aussi sur ‘Kathimerini’ : ‘Sikinos, l’originale’ (en grec). Mais il y a également des sites en français.

30/10/2008

(Grèce hebdo)

 

Evros, le refuge de toute espèce de vie

 

Le deuxième plus grand fleuve des Balkans après le Danube, carrefour entre l´Europe et l´Asie, la rivière d’Evros, au nord-ouest de la Grèce, a deux biotopes importants, le Delta d’Evros et la forêt de Dadia, riches en flore et faune. Le Delta d’Evros, est un biotope international régi par la Convention de RAMSAR et protégé par des conventions européennes. Le Delta, une région pleine de lacs, de lagons, de marais et d’un environnement aquatique exceptionnel, est un refuge pour les oiseaux migrateurs et de nombreuses espèces rares. Avec plus de 304 espèces d´oiseaux et 350 espèces de plantes, c’est le lieu idéal pour une balade en barque. Un peu plus au nord, se trouve la forêt de Dadia, le deuxième biotope de la région, protégé par l´état grec dès la fin des années ‘70 et l’un des derniers refuges de rapaces très rares dans toute l´Europe. La forêt est une mosaïque de biotopes, accueillant des espèces d´oiseux, de reptiles, d’amphibiens et de mammifères, un lieu attirant pour les ornithologues mais aussi pour tous ceux qui aiment la nature. Le Centre Ecotouristique du biotope de Dadia donne aux visiteurs la possibilité de se loger, mais aussi de s’informer sur la région et ses ‘populations’, alors que l´Observatoire d’oiseaux, au milieu de la forêt, donne vue sur la station de ravitaillement des rapaces. Au-delà l’observation des oiseaux et de la nature, la marche dans la forêt de Dadia, conduit le visiteur aux ruines d’un château byzantin et à la découverte d’un paysage magique.

23/10/2008

(Grèce hebdo)

 

Kastoria, une ville charmante aux pieds d’un lac 

Construite en amphithéâtre sur les bords d’un lac, la petite ville de Kastoria au nord-ouest de la Grèce, est une ville calme et charmante, d´une beauté naturelle exceptionnelle. Entourée des montagnes Grammos et Vitsi, Kastoria reflète son charme dans le lac Orestiada, attirant, par sa nature riche, des visiteurs pendant toutes les époques de l´année. Habitée dès les temps préhistoriques, comme le témoigne les vestiges de la cité de Dispilio, la ville constituait un centre important aux temps byzantins avec des églises et chapelles qui ont été préservées en grand nombre jusqu’à nos jours. La ville a connu un grand épanouissement économique vers les 18ème et 19ème siècles grâce à son industrie de la fourrure, renommée à l´époque dans toute l´Europe. Le visiteur peut admirer non seulement les monuments historiques de Kastoria, les églises, les monastères, les manoirs, mais aussi ses beautés naturelles choisissant de faire le tour du lac en bateau ou se balader le long “de la montagne du lac” appréciant les jolies couleurs et les beaux paysages de l'endroit où on peut voir des pélicans, des cygnes et autres oiseaux. Pour ceux qui aiment les sports, le canotage, le canoë-kayak, la marche etc. comptent parmi les meilleures options pour admirer la nature de Kastoria.

16/10/2008

(Grèce hebdo)

 

Antipaxoi, une île verte de 6,5 km² 

Antipaxoi est une toute petite île d’une vingtaine d’habitants permanents, à 3 miles nautiques de Paxoi, au sud de Corfu, connue par sa beauté naturelle, sa végétation abondante, ses plages avec du sable blanc et des eaux claires turquoise. L’île est couverte de vignobles car la spécialité de l’île est un fameux vin rouge. En été, la plupart des visiteurs arrivent par bateau pour la journée, attirés surtout par les plages superbes de Vrika et Voutoumi. Mais à la fin de la journée c’est le calme absolu et ça vaut la peine d’y rester quelques jours. Il y a des chambres pour loger et des petits restaurants au poisson frais pour manger. Infos et photos, cherchez ‘Antipaxoi’.

09/10/2008

(Grèce hebdo)

 

Samothrace : Une montagne en pleine mer 

Samothrace est une île montagneuse de 178 km² au nord-est de la mer Egée. Le sommet de Saos a une hauteur de 1664 mètres. L’eau coule de partout et la végétation est abondante, malgré l’appétit solide d’un grand nombre de chèvres. Les torrents forment des cascades et de petits étangs (‘vathres’) ou on peut aisément se baigner. Mais les chemins pour y aller sont difficiles et destinés aux grimpeurs. Kamariotissa, le port de l’île, Therma un site avec des bains thermales et Chora, la capitale, un beau village situé à l’intérieur, sont les agglomérations où se concentre la plus grande partie de l’infrastructure touristique. Samothrace est un paradis pour tous ceux qui aiment l´alpinisme mais aussi pour les plongeurs sous-marins. Les baigneurs aiment les plages à Pachia Ammos et Kipi.

L'île est peuplée dès l'Antiquité et abrite le sanctuaire des Grands Dieux, un culte à mystères connu dans toute la Grèce. Les ruines à Palaiochora sont impressionnantes. Au 19eme siècle des archéologues Français ont découvert la statue de la Victoire de Samothrace et l’ont transporté au Musée du Louvre.

L’agriculture et l’élevage ont été l’occupation principale des 2700 habitants. Ceux-ci se tournent de nos jours de plus en plus vers le tourisme. Samothrace réunit un grand nombre  des visiteurs fidèles venus tant du reste de la Grèce que de l´étranger mais leur nombre reste encore relativement limité, à cause de la distance qui la sépare des grands centres urbains. Il n’y a pas d’aéroport et le voyage le plus habituel c’est par bateau d’Alexandroupolis, à l’extrémité nord-est du pays. Une visite à Samothrace est une aventure, ce qui ne fait que multiplier son charme.

Pour ce qui est des Infos touristiques (en anglais ou en grec), cherchez les termes ‘Samothrace’ ou ‘Samothraki’

02/10/2008

(Grèce hebdo)

Les Météores, c’est un miracle 

Tout le monde les connaît, peu nombreux sont ceux qui les ont vus. Situés au nord de la Grèce Centrale, près de la ville de Kalambaka, à 350 Kms d’Athènes, les Météores ne sont pas à la porte à coté pour le touriste moyen. Pourtant, après le Mont Athos, les Météores sont le lieu avec la plus grande concentration de monastères en Grèce. Dans le temps, il y avait 30 monastères, pour la plupart fondés au 14ème siècle. Aujourd’hui il en reste six. Le site est inscrit depuis 1988 dans la liste du patrimoine mondial de l’UNESCO.

Les monastères, construits au sommet de masses rocheuses, donnent l’impression d’être ‘’suspendus au ciel’’. Les bâtiments sont d’une architecture impressionnante. Un nombre d’églises sont décorées avec des fresques des plus grands artistes de l’époque, comme Théophane le Crétois et Frango Castellano de Thèbes. Quelques monastères ont installé un musée, où l’on peut admirer des objets du culte, des ornements, des manuscrits précieux ou des vêtements traditionnels. Les Météores constituent un décor grandiose et surprenant, résultat du mariage entre le génie de la nature et celui de l’Homme. [Voir lepetitjournal.com – Les Météores ou le génie de la nature. Voir aussi  Ministry of Culture / Meteora.]

Infos et photos en français cherchez ‘’Les Météores” :

25/09/2008

(Grèce hebdo)

 

Zagori, c’est la montagne 

Zagori est une région montagneuse de 1000km² au nord-ouest de la Grèce, au nord-est de la ville de Ioannina. La région est connue aussi comme ‘Zagorochoria’, par les 46 villages (chorio = village) dispersés dans la montagne. Les plus connus sont Papingo, Monodendri, Aristi, Vomvoussa, Kipi. Les villages et les environs sont d’une beauté naturelle et architecturale extraordinaire qui vous donne la possibilité de promenades interminables dans une nature formidable de hautes montagnes, de forêts, de gorges, de rivières et de lacs. Très particuliers sont les vieux ponts de pierre (photo). A ne pas manquer la gorge de Vikos qui est une des plus grandes, des plus profondes et des plus impressionnantes gorges d’Europe.

Zagori est avant tout le calme absolu. Mais pour les sportifs il y a de possibilités de canoë-kayac, de nage, d’escalade, de VVT, d’équitation. Aujourd’hui un grand nombre de petits hôtels traditionnels, combinant simplicité et confort, peut satisfaire chaque goût.

Pour ceux qui aiment la montagne, Zagori est un must.

Infos en français et photos : http://www.zagorama.com/zagori-gen/french/index-fr.html 

18/09/2008

(Grèce hebdo)

 

Chalki, une belle petite île calme 

Chalki est une petite île montagneuse de 28km² à l’ouest de Rhodes, à 302 miles nautiques du Pirée. C’est une île habitée depuis l’antiquité, qui a pris son nom de ses mines de cuivre. Le seul village, avec 300 habitants, c’est le port de Nimborio avec peu de tourisme, quelques petits hôtels et tavernes, un quai tranquille, sans voitures, sans bruit. Ses petites maisons néoclassiques avec des toits de tuiles -les restants d’un riche passé- contournent la baie. L’eau du port est limpide parce que Chalki est la première petite île grecque avec un système de traitement des eaux. Il y a une plage près du village et quelques petites plus loin, pas toujours facile à accéder. Mais on peut se baigner partout, même dans le port, ou faire de grandes randonnées. Toute l’île fait partie du programme ‘Natura 2000’.

Chalki est connue pour son festival de musique en septembre et ses séminaires de relations internationales, organisés par l’institut ELIAMEP dans une ancienne industrie d’éponges, maintenant transformée en hôtel.

On y arrive par grand bateau de Pirée, ou de Rhodes, et par petit bateau de Kamiros à Rhodes.

Chalki c’est le calme absolu. La seule nervosité que l'on peut discerner c’est quand le vent se lève et la question se pose: ‘’est ce que l’autorité portuaire va interdire le départ des bateaux ?’’.

Infos : http://www.halki.gr (grec, anglais) ou http://www.chalkiholidays.gr/index_french.htm (français)

12/09/2008

(Grèce hebdo)

 

Pélion, la montagne des centaures 

A l’est de la Thessalie, entre Athènes et Thessalonique, il y a une péninsule qui combine une montagne verdoyante avec de superbes plages. C’est Pélion, une destination touristique ‘quatre saisons’, où, selon le mythe, habitaient les centaures et où les dieux de l’Olympe venaient passer l’été. Une haute montagne de 1624 mètres, 70 villages avec des maisons d’une architecture exceptionnelle, une nature abondante, des arbres fruitiers, des forêts de hêtre et de châtaigniers, une vue splendide sur la mer Egée,  composent un paysage unique, en toute saison. Pélion est connu pour sa fraîcheur en été et ses pentes enneigées en hiver. On y trouve même un centre de ski, avec trois pistes. Quelques villages organisent des manifestations culturelles, comme le festival de musique de Agios Lavrentios. 

La région de Pélion connaît  des espèces rares de flore et faune et fait partie du programme européen ‘Natura 2000’. Pour les randonnées à pied, on peut utiliser les vieux chemins de pavés, connus comme ‘calderimia’. 29 d’entre eux (en total 190 Kms) ont été récemment restaurés.

N’oubliez pas de visiter la ville de Volos et ses fameuses tavernes, connues comme ‘tsipouradika’.

Infos (anglais, grec): www.magnesia-tourism.gr, www.e-pelion.gr, www.pelion.com.gr

04/09/2008

(Grèce hebdo)

‘Les portes d’Achéron’ 

En Epire, à l’ouest de la Grèce, à 8 km au sud de Parga, la rivière Achéron (le ‘sans joie’) se jette dans la mer, après un court voyage de 52 kms. Les anciens croyaient que se trouvait là l’entrée de Hadès, le royaume des morts. Homère décrit le passage d’Ulysse, qui descend à Hadès pour demander comment retourner à Ithaque. Il y avait même un ‘nekromanteio’  un ‘oracle des Morts’ où les anciens essayaient de communiquer avec leurs morts et dont les restes ont été découverts en 1958.

C’est n’est pas par hasard que les anciens grecs ont placé Hadès à cet endroit. Avant de se jeter à la mer, à la belle plage de Ammoudia, Achéron passe par un canyon rocheux et arrose par la suite une vallée, d’une grande variété de flore et de faune. Dans l’antiquité, la nature était encore plus abondante, avec des lacs et des marais, belle et mystérieuse à la fois. Aujourd’hui Achéron est un biotope et fait partie du programme ‘Natura 2000’.

La région offre tout ce qu’un touriste peut souhaiter : La plage classique de sable fin, une belle nature, la possibilité de faire des randonnées en montagne et des tours en bateau et canoë dans la rivière, d’observer les oiseaux, de visiter des sites archéologiques. Et, à la fin de la journée, visiter une taverne pour savourer les délices du pays. Achéron n’est plus ‘sans joie’ aujourd’hui.

Attention : les sites sont en grec. Essayez Parga, et un reportage du Canoë-club de Genève

07/08/2008

 (GNA)

 

Magic Small Islands 

Koufonisia is a cluster of two islands, Kato (Lower) and Pano (Upper) Koufonisi that belongs to the complex of Small Cyclades. Geographically, it is located on the southeast side of Naxos and on the west side of Amorgos. Koufonisia also include the tiny, uninhabited island of Keros, which is a protected archaeological site from which a good number of ancient Cycladic art has been excavated in the 20th century. 

The main occupation of the locals is fishing, so Koufonisi is a true fish village where visitors may eat fish and seafood in abundance. It has one of the biggest fishing fleets in Greece. Its heavenly beaches - mostly sandy - are part of the magic of this picturesque island.

05/08/2008

 (GNA)

 

A unique national marine park 

The Mediterranean Monk Seal also known as Monachus Monachus, is Europe's most endangered marine mammal, and is among the six most endangered mammals in the world.

Greece has allocated a vast area for the preservation of the Monachus Monachus and its habitat in the Aegean Sea. The Greek National Sea Park of Alonissos - Northern Sporades(www.alonissos-park.gr), which extends around the Northern Sporades island complex, and is the main action ground of the Hellenic Society for the study and protection of the monk seal (Mom). It should be stated that legislation in Greece is very strict towards the hunting of the seal and that the public in general is very much aware and supportive of the effort for the preservation of the Monachus Monachus.

The National Marine Park of Alonnisos - Northern Sporades was the first designated Marine Park in the country and is currently the largest marine protected area in Europe (approximately 2,260 Km2). Besides the sea area, the Park includes Alonnisos (www.alonissos.gr), six smaller islands (Peristera, Kyra Panagia, Gioura, Psathura, Piperi and Skantzoura), as well as 22 uninhabited islets and rocky outcrops.

The Northern Sporades island-complex stretches out into the Aegean, east of the Pelion peninsula. On the serene Sporades, life still continues along its old rhythms. Tourism has brought prosperity to these islands without affecting much of their traditional lifestyle, especially on the island of Alonissos.

National Marine Park of Alonnisos - Northern Sporades: Photo Gallery

28/07/2008

 (GNA)

 

A grey landscape of rock, broken up here and there by a gleaming white chapel, is the first impression on visitors as the ferry draws into the harbour of the island of Sifnos. On a plateau six kilometers from the port, one encounters a unique spectacle: the whole of the plateau is covered with sparkling white villages which virtually blend into one another. The island was famous in ancient times for the wealth, which came from its gold and silver mines and the quarries of Sifnos stone. It enjoyed great prosperity in classical times, as can be seen from its treasury, dedicated to Apollo at Delphi.                                                                        

More info: Tourist Guide 

23/07/2008

 (GNA)

 

Samos – an island with something for everyone: crystal clear waters, steep cliffs, wild canyons, waterfalls, gentle slopes with pastures, vineyards and wild orchids, villages with marvellous traditional houses, a rich fauna and flora, a unique atmosphere on one of the few islands that can lay claim to the hearts of those who love mountains as much as the beach. When on the island, one must visit Pythagorio, and archaeological hotspot: built on the ruins of the ancient city of Samos during the time of Polycrates, it condenses more than twenty-six centuries of history. Another place to visit is the Archaeological Museum, where exhibits are housed in two buildings.

22/07/2008

 (GNA)

 

Symi 

The island of Symi (www.symi.gr) belongs to the group of  Dodecanese islands. Though stylish and cosmopolitan, it has managed to remain simple and unspoiled. No modern concrete construction, no high-rise hotels, no villa complexes. Few other islands have Symi's crisp brightness and its amphitheatre of imposing neo-classical mansions, in traditional shades, stacked one on top of the other up the barren hillside. Sporting the rugged charm of its dry landscape and its breathtaking harbour Gialos, this small, beautiful island has experienced tourism, embraced it, and absorbed it, without letting it harm its charm.

18/07/2008

 (GNA)

 

The island of Naxos is the largest and the most fertile in the Cyclades group of islands. Its numerous sandy beaches make it an ideal holiday place for people who seek a quiet and beautiful are for their vacation. More than 64 villages, most of which are mountainous, cover its slopes. They are well known for their cool climate and their delicious local cuisine. Sport and nature lovers should not miss the walking tour in the fertile Tragea plains, where one sees Byzantine chapels, Venetian residence towers and picturesque villages. The Naxos Festival at the Bazeos Tower, (19 July to 4 September) guarantees a rich cultural life during vacation. Don’t miss this year’s exhibition on the theme: "Art and Madness." At nights, as one may relax by the sea, and one must definitely try the excellent citron liqueur, produced at Khalki village.

It must be noted that the Archaelogical Museum of Naxos has a unique collection of Cycladic statues and artifacts, dating back to 2800 B.C.

17/07/2008

(Grèce hebdo)

 

Mystras, une ancienne cité Byzantine 

La cité de Mystras (ou Mistra), aujourd'hui en ruines, est une ancienne cité Byzantine sur les hauteurs du Taygette, en Morée (Péloponnèse), six kilometres à l’ouest de Sparte. Fondée par les Francs en 1249, Mystras fut cédée à l’empereur de Byzance qui a fait de la forteresse la capitale du Despotat de Morée, statut qu'elle a conservé jusqu'à la chute de l'Empire byzantin en 1453. Mystras est devenue la deuxième ville de l'Empire après Constantinople, et la deuxième résidence des empereurs et a connu une longue période de prospérité économique et culturelle. Les ruines du palais, un grand nombre d’églises –dont certaines fonctionnent encore- et d’habitations, sont aujourd’hui les témoins d’un passé glorieux. Détruite par Ibrahim Pascha en 1825 l'ancienne cité byzantine fut totalement abandonnée dans les années 1950 pour devenir un site archéologique, en 1989 inscrite sur la liste du patrimoine mondial de l'UNESCO.

Mystras est un monument unique de l'architecture et de la civilisation Byzantine, dans un paysage magnifique et mérite absolument le voyage. A ne pas manquer si vous êtes dans le Péloponnèse.

Vous trouverez un grand nombre de sites internet avec des infos sur Mystras, aussi en français.

17/07/2008

 (GNA)

 

Greek lake districts

Whilst Greece is mostly known for its wonderful seaside, it also has remarkable places near lakes. Start off in one of the most beautiful wetland areas in Europe: Prespes. Two lakes covering thousands of hectares and situated high up at an altitude of over 800 meters are a paradise for nature-lovers. Next stop Kastoria: a historic town, built on a peninsula in the beautiful lake Orestiada, surrounded by mountains, a different experience altogether! Further east stop in Edessa, to see the waterfall park in the middle of the town. Final destination: the Lake Kerkini, nestled between two separate mountain ranges, one of the few examples of a man-made intervention that has become a great ecological success. It now serves as a safe haven for 227 species of birds and is a paradise for bird-watchers.

Places to Stay: www.yourgreece.gr ; More info on Greek lakes: www.visitgreece.gr

16/07/2008

 (GNA)

 

The island of Kalymnos (www.kalymnos-isl.gr), part of the Dodecanese islands in the Aegean sea, is the island of sponge-divers. Their stories about the difficulties of the past, the preparation, the "divers’ disease," as well as the museum of the sponge-divers indicate that the past has left its mark on the future.

Kalymnos - located at about 300 kilometers south east of Athens, and 100 north west of Rhodes - is now considered one of the must-visit climbing destinations because of its dedication to sport climbing. There are nearly 1000 routes, featuring stalactites, vertical slabs, roofs and fantastic caves. More than 30 areas have been developed, offering a variety of beautiful routes (Rock climbing sectors & routes.

11/07/2008

 (GNA)

 

TAKE TO THE MOUNTAINS

Picturesque and culturally fascinating, the mountainous areas offer a wealth of exceptional trekking amongst impressive peaks. Mount Olympus is the highest mountain in Greece, at 2919 meters high, located 100 km southwest of the city of Thessaloniki in northern Greece. In Greek mythology, Mt Olympus was the abode of the Twelve Olympians. From its steep rocky summit, the site of his throne, Zeus supposedly hurled his thunderbolts against humankind. Greece’s oldest and most carefully protected national park, Mt Olympus also boasts the greatest concentration of flora and fauna, huge expanses of forest, and the crystal clear waters of the Enippeas river. The Pindos Mountains, situated in the northwest corner of Greece, are a rugged and remote region of peaks, high limestone cliffs, spectacular gorges, and rushing rivers. Visit Zagorochoria, a world of walled villages perched atop and within the thousand-foot gorge of the Vikos River, the deepest one in the world after the Grand Canyon in Arizona.

10/07/2008

 (GNA)

 

Karpathos (www.karpathos.gr) is the second largest island in the Dodecanese group. Spectacularly beautiful, with wild, rugged landscape, mountainous in the north and fertile in the south, with wildflowers, Karpathos is a paradise for naturalists. It has extensive beaches with white sands.  Traditions have been well kept in Karpathos. In Olympos village, women still wear their beautiful, colourful, traditional costumes every day, and bake bread in their outdoor ovens.

10/07/2008

(Grèce hebdo)

 

Mani: Châteaux, tours, vedettes, coutumes d’une autre époque 

Mani est une vaste région du Sud de Péloponnèse, s’étendant entre deux départements, Lakonia et Messinia. Les nombreux peuples différents qui passé de la région, les Francs, les Vénitiens, les Ottomans, ont tous laissé leurs traces, s’agissant surtout des châteaux de valeur archéologique importante. Pour se protéger des vagues successives de conquéreurs, les habitants ont cherché refuge à ce qu’il constitue actuellement l’attribue le plus caractéristique de cette région: les tours. Plus de 800 tours sont actuellement préservées, et servent non seulement de résidence privée, mais aussi d’hôtel ou de musée. A découvrir aussi les grottes, la montagne Taygète avec sa flore spectaculaire et ses chemins à randonnée, tout comme les plages d’eaux bleues de la région. 

Mani combine le charme de la montagne avec la tranquillité de la mer, la beauté sauvage de la pierre avec la grâce des forêts et l’histoire avec les coutumes actuelles. Parmi ces dernières figurent la ‘vendetta’ et les chants de deuil. La vendetta, pratique active jusqu’à la 2e guerre mondiale, protégeant l’honneur et le statut social de la famille, a alimenté les chants de deuil, fameux en Grèce pour leur passion et leurs moyens d’exprimer la douleur.

L’hospitalité des habitants fait aussi partie des traditions de la région, qui vous accueillera chaleureusement pour vous transférer dans une autre époque.

04/07/2008

 (GNA)

 

JEWELS IN THE CROWN: SANTORINI 

A unique landscape 

Santorini island (Thera) was the site of one of the largest volcanic eruptions about 3,500 years ago. The eruption left a large caldera surrounded by volcanic and its effects may have indirectly led to the collapse of the Minoan civilization on the island of Crete. Due to its imposing landscape and amazing views, the stunning sunsets, its terrifying birth related to the myth of Atlantis, and its special indigenous architecture, Santorini is considered an unmatched tourist experience.          

Info: www.santorini.gr ; Santorini Guide book 2008 

The Viniculture 

Apart from the uniqueness of the breathtaking landscape, the island is also famous for its distinctive wine production. Superb dry and dessert grape varieties cultivated in Santorini, give a special but excellent taste in its wines. Assyrtiko, Athiri, Vinsanto are some of the most popular appellations.

Awards of Santorini wines: 8th Thessalooniki Int'l Wine Competition;  Int'l wine and spirit competition 2008 & Gold medal at the Int'l Wine challenge 2008

03/07/2008

(Grèce hebdo)

Astypalea, le papillon de la mer 

Située au milieu de la Mer Egée, Astypalea (ou Astypalaia), une île de 97 km² en forme de papillon, fait partie du Dodécanèse mais a l’air des Cyclades. Sa capitale, Chora, bâtie sur une presque île, avec le château médiéval des Guerini au centre, est sans doute l’une des plus belles capitales des îles grecques. A 117 milles nautiques du Pirée, presque 10 heures de bateau, Astypalea est relativement isolée, mais c’est ce qui lui a fait garder son originalité et son charme particulier.

Riche en histoire et traditions, avec des maisons entourées de bougainvilliers, cette île de 1100 habitants, est un endroit idéal pour des vacances tranquilles. La base de la gastronomie locale, simple mais pure, est le poisson frais et une combinaison de produits de l’île (chèvre, fromage, yoghourt, pain au safran, thym, miel). Pour les baigneurs il y a des plages proches et lointaines, ces dernières accessibles par voiture, vélomoteur ou bateau. Une visite à la belle plage de la petite île de Koutsomytis vaut certainement la peine. Astypalea essaye d’attirer les touristes alternatifs, les promeneurs, les grimpeurs, les cyclistes tout terrain, les spéléologues. En saison il y a même un festival de musique.

L’île est aussi accessible par petit avion d’Athènes ou de Rhodes.

[Info : le site de la municipalité d’Astypalea (grec/anglais). Mais il y a aussi des sites en français.]

02/07/2008

 (GNA)

 

 Zakynthos (also known as Zante), the third largest of the Ionian Islands, boasts emerald beaches, mountains full of pine trees, caves, traditional architecture, and inhabitants with a particularly hospitable spirit. The area of Laganas Bay is renowned for its small sandy beaches, considered to be the most important nesting sites for the Mediterranean green loggerhead turtle - Caretta caretta - both in Greece and perhaps the entire Mediterranean region. The Zakynthos National Marine Park, the first of its kind in Greece, encompasses Laganas Bay and the islets of Marathonissi and Pelouzo, and promotes sustainable development in the area.

More Info: Region of Ionian Islands & The Prefecture of Zakynthos

01/07/2008

 (GNA)

 

Folegandros is a welcoming small island in the Aegean that has led to the creation of its own fan club, as visitors keep coming, year after year, to meet friends from all over the world. They report that they remain spellbound by its beauty and by the hospitality of its inhabitants who seem to consider visitors as honorary guests in a family reunion.

Once again this summer, from July 5 to 20, the Media dell' Arte company, in co-operation with the Municipality of Folegandros, is sponsoring "Folegandros Festivities 2008." The Media dell’ Arte company consists of artists and academics who form a non profitable organisation. The group has put together a cultural project called "Isolario" which aims at keeping the small Cycladic islands’ cultural heritage alive through various cultural activities which take place every year on the islands of Folegandros, Sikinos, Donousa, Amorgos and Kimolos. 

27/06/2008

 (GNA)

 

EPIDAURUS 

Epidaurus, a small, ancient Greek city in the Peloponnese is now a UNESCO World Heritage Monument. It was a small, ancient Greek city on an inlet of the Saronic Gulf, northeast Peloponnese. Reputed to be the birthplace of Apollo's son, Asklepios, the Greek God of Medicine, Epidaurus was known for its sanctuary, as well as its theater with the wonderful acoustics. The Asclepieion at Epidaurus was the most celebrated healing center of the Classical world, the place where ill people went in the hope of being cured. The prosperity brought by the Asklepieion enabled Epidaurus to construct civic monuments such as the huge theater, renowned for its symmetry and beauty, which is used once again for hosting dramatic performances. Athens and Epidaurus Festival establishment  in 1955 placed ancient drama firmly centre stage and ever since, the theatre has been hosting performances every summer.

26/06/2008

(Grèce hebdo)

 

Cythère: Île d’Aphrodite, île de la beauté

Selon la mythologie grecque, les eaux de l’île de Cythère (ou Kythira), située au Sud du Péloponnèse, ont vu naître la déesse Aphrodite. L’île constitue dès l’antiquité un pont maritime entre la Grèce continentale et la Crète. Grâce à sa position elle a été rapidement transformée en centre commercial important où les arts et la culture ont également fleuri.

Actuellement, Cythère offre au visiteur une beauté naturelle exceptionnelle à admirer, une histoire fascinante à découvrir et une variété de festivités culturelles à apprécier, surtout pendant l’été. L’île offre une infrastructure touristique adéquate, mais qui n’a pas altéré son caractère traditionnel. Ne manquez pas de rendre visite aux châteaux vénitiens, qui font preuve de la riche histoire maritime de l’île, ainsi qu’à la petite ville byzantine, actuellement inhabitée mais soigneusement préservée, qui fut auparavant capitale de Cythère jusqu’à sa destruction en 1537par le pirate légendaire Barbarossa.

[Infos:Site de la municipalité de Cythère (en grec), Kythera.gr ]

24/06/2008

 (GNA)

 

The island of Samothraki in the North Aegean lies some 29 nautical miles southwest of the Thracian city of Alexandroupolis. Far from being a typical Greek island, it ressembles a mountain surrounded by sea. Its highest peak, Mount Fengari, rises to almost 1,700 metres. Samothraki is one of the truly virgin islands, where one can bathe in the shade of sycamore trees. Its singular mountain terrain, its abundance of crystal clear water, its archaeological finds along with an intangible mysticism that hovers in the air, offer the visitor an exotic holiday. To the north of the main town, Hora, is Paleopolis, the archaic and Hellenistic centre of the island, where there are still ruins of the Ancient City and the Sanctuary of the Great Gods. This is where the Cabeiri Rites took place, mystical ceremonies of equal importance to the Eleusinian, probably aiming to secure life after death. The island's most famous artistic treasure is the 2.5-metre marble statue of Nike, now known as the Winged Victory of Samothrace, dating from about 190 BC. It was discovered in pieces on the island in 1863 and is now displayed in the Louvre museum in Paris.

19/06/2008

(Grèce hebdo)

 

Le parc environnemental d’Arcturos   

La municipalité de Aetos, près de Florina, au Nord de la Grèce, se situe dans un paysage fantastique de montagnes, forêts, lacs et sources d’eau thermale. Une des attractions de la région est le Parc environnemental d’Arcturos, une ONG dédiée à la sauvegarde de l’espèce rare du plus gros carnivore d’Europe, l’ours brun. A partir de 1992, Arcturos trouve des ours en captivité dans les Balkans, qui ne peuvent plus survivre dans un milieu sauvage, et les transfère dans le Parc, qui fait partie de la forêt constituant l’environnent naturel de l’ours. Arcturos se lance aussi dans la sauvegarde du loup gris, espèce rare et protégée, dont la reproduction est menacée, à cause de la chasse illégale et de la destruction de ses biotopes.

Parmi les activités d’Arcturos figurent des programmes d’éducation environnementale adressés aux élèves. Ses locaux et spécialement le Parc accueillent plus de 50.000 visiteurs par an. Il vaut la peine que vous soyez l’un d’entre eux ! 

 12/06/2008

(Grèce hebdo)

 

Le parc transfrontalier de Prespes 

La région des Prespes au Nord-Ouest de la Grèce est sûrement une de plus belles, intactes et intéressantes de la Grèce à visiter. Le plateau de Prespes de 850m d’altitude contient deux lacs, le Grand et le Petit, partagés entre la Grèce et ses pays voisins, l’Albanie et l’ARYM. La nature est d’une beauté exceptionnelle et la biodiversité constatée est unique en Europe, comportant plus de 1500 espèces de plantes, 12 types de flore forestière et 46 espèces de mammifères rares comme les loups gris, les ours et les ibis. De même, la région constitue le biotope le plus important de la Grèce avec 260 espèces d’oiseaux, parmi lesquels les espèces rares des cormorans-pygmées et des pélicans blancs et dalmatiens. En outre, le visiteur a l’occasion de voir l’île minuscule d’Aghios Achillios avec ses églises d’architecture caractéristique datant du 10ème siècle, les monuments byzantins et post-byzantins de la région, ainsi que plusieurs caveaux habités auparavant par des moines. La région de Prespes fait partie de la plus grande réserve naturelle de la Grèce et est protégée aussi par le programme pour la protection du patrimoine mondial de l’UNESCO. 

[Voir UNESCO; Parc transfrontalier de Prespes]

10/06/2008

 (GNA)

Aegina, an island full of natural beauties and great history, lies in the Saronic Gulf, in close proximity to the port of Piraeus. Having served as the first capital of Greece (1827-1829), it houses several landmark buildings, such as the Government House.

Time travel continues with the ancient temple of Aphaea (on the left), built in the northern part of the island in an area covered with pine trees, overlooking the sea. Under the proper weather conditions, the visitor has visual access to both Poseidon's temple in Sounio and the Acropolis, the 3 temples forming an equilateral triangle. Furthermore, a visit to the Monastery of St Nektarios is highly recommended.

06/06/2008

 (GNA)

 

Lemnos is a beautiful, unspoiled Greek island that offers many opportunities for relaxing holidays. More than a hundred golden sandy beaches, crystal clear waters, volcanic landscape, and traditional settlements will charm the visitor. Lemnos boasts important archaeological sites, the pre-hestoric Poliochni, Kaveria and Haephestos, as well as natural sites such as the lake Chortarolimni with its flock of migrant birds and the fish ponds of Gomatiand. Lemnos is also a water-sports lovers’ paradise because of its strong winds. Its sought-after products, especially the limnian wine "moschato," honey and "kalathaki”" its delicious cheese, will captivate every gourmet traveller. Myrina, its capital, is a particularly picturesque small town with wonderful cobbled paths and red-tiled houses. For nature-lovers, the village of Kodopouli, with its two invaluable biotopes (lakes), is a must.

Agrotravel: Set sail for the Homeric windy island of Lemnos!

 05/06/2008

(Grèce hebdo)

 

Kythnos : Tellement proche, tellement inconnue 

Kythnos est une île des Cyclades très proche du Pirée, mais, paradoxalement, elle reste une des îles les plus authentiques et parfois presque sauvage. Toutefois, un voyage à Kythnos peut constituer une expérience unique. Pour quelqu'un qui cherche le calme et le repos, cette île est une destination à considérer. Située à moins de trois heures du Pirée, dotée de plages formidables et de villages pittoresques qui ont gardé leur caractère et où l’on peut voir plusieurs édifices d’architecture néoclassique, Kythnos vous séduira par ses festivals locaux se déroulant surtout pendant l’été, ses 365 églises et monastères (une église pour chaque jour de l’année), ses paysages lunaires traversés de murailles de pierre brune, ses moulins traditionnels, ainsi que par la vue stupéfiante que chaque point de l’île offre vers la mer Egée.

C’est une île qui vit en toute simplicité. Il faut pourtant noter qu’avec un parc photovoltaïque et des éoliennes, Kythnos est presque indépendante en électricité.

[Voir aussi : http://www.google.fr/kythnos]

 29/05/2008

(Grèce hebdo)

Folégandros: Beauté sauvage et couleur traditionnelle

Folégandros se situe au Sud-Ouest des Cyclades. C’est une île récemment découverte par l’essor touristique, ayant donc conservé son caractère original, tout en dévelopant parallèlement son infrastructure d’accueil.

C’est l’île idéale pour des longues randonnées dans les rues dallées de Khora et les ruelles du Kastro, ses plages sauvages avec des eaux cristallisées de couleur bleue - verte sont là à découvrir, la vue panoramique de l’Egée offerte par la montée sur la colline escarpée de la Panayia (la Sainte Vierge) est unique et magnifique. Il ne tient qu’à vous de goûter à sa cuisine familiale traditionnelle, de vous désaltérer de rakomélo (boisson à base d’eau de vie et de miel), la nuit, sur les placettes de Khora, à Karavostasi, à Agkali ou à Ano Méria, tous des villages pittoresques d’une beauté exceptionnelle.

En juillet, ne manquez pas les Fêtes de Folégandros, le festival d’été (théâtre, film, musique grecque et classique) qui anime l’île. Au Printemps, ne manquez pas Pâques, célébré ici d’une manière totalement originale, unique en Grèce. [Info utile]

23/05/2008

 (GNA)

Although unspoiled by mass tourism, Sikinos is anything but a tiny, forgotten island. On the contrary, it has opted for an alternative development. It offers few, small beaches, while in the town of Hora, local architecture is exemplarily preserved. As a mode of transport, cars are not fit for Sikinos, so one must try riding donkeys, or just hiking. Last but not least, residents of Sikinos contribute to the island’s magic: an active community, which has revived the old vineyards, has set up a beekeeping cooperative and even operates a recycling programme.

Kathimerini Daily: Sikinos opts for a different way to develop; see also TheGreektravel.com: Sikinos

22/05/2008

(Grèce hebdo)

 

Kastelorizo, l’île la plus éloignée de la Grèce

Kastelorizo (Kastellorizo) se situe à 130 km (72 miles nautiques) à l’est de Rhodes et à 2 km des côtes turques. On peut y arriver par bateau du Pirée ou de Rhodes et par avion de Rhodes. Ella a eu son nom officiel, Megisti, parce qu’avec 9,2 km² elle est la plus grande d’un groupe de 14 petites îles. Le seul port et agglomération, Kastelorizo, abrite quelques 400 habitants permanents. Au long du port, une série de maisons néoclassiques s’allonge devant le rochet rouge, témoins d’un passé glorieux.

L’île reste encore assez calme, malgré la publicité accordée par le film ‘’Mediterraneo’’, qui y a été tourné. Un monastère, un château, quelques ruines antiques, beaucoup d’églises et une mosquée méritent une visite. Mais c’est surtout le calme, la lumière et les eaux limpides qui attirent les voyageurs. A ne pas manquer ‘’la grotte bleue’’ au sud de l’île.

[Info en français : Google.fr/Kastelorizo]

02/05/2008

 (GNA)

Jewels in the Crown 

The island of Naxos is the largest and the most fertile in the Cyclades group of islands. More than 64 villages, most of which are mountainous, cover its slopes. They are well known for their cool climate and their delicious local cuisine. Sport and nature lovers should not miss the walking tour in the fertile Tragea plains, where one can see. Byzantine chapels, Venetian residence towers and picturesque villages. The annual Naxos Festival (this year’s date to be determined) at the Bazeos Tower guarantees a rich cultural life during ones sojourn. As for liquor connoisseurs, the local citron liqueur, produced in Khalki village, is something to be experienced!

24/04/2008

(Grèce hebdo)

 Elafonissi (îlot ou presqu’île)

Après Elafonissos, Grèce Hebdo présente la seconde ‘‘île des cerfs’’, Elafonissi. Elafonissi, une île déserte de 3km², est presque collée à la côte sud-ouest de l’île de Crète.  Elle est réputée par sa fameuse plage de sable blanc qui a la particularité d'avoir des reflets roses. Des bateaux venant de Palaiochora amènent les baigneurs pour la journée. Mais quand le temps est beau et la mer calme, on peut s’y rendre à pied, car c’est seulement un bras de rochers peu profonds qui le séparent de la côte.

Elafonissi est un site protégé du programme environnemental ‘‘Natura 2000’’.

Photos Elafonissi : http://www.crete-photos.gr/thumbnails.php?album=11

[Voir aussi google.fr/elafonissi]

23/04/2008

(GNA)

 

The island of Skyros lies in the Northern Aegean, the largest and most isolated of the Northern Sporades. The island is more or less divided into two halves: the fertile north, with its green, rolling hillsides and the barren, mountainous region in the south. The capital "Skyros" or "Hora" is built amphitheatrically on the slopes of a hill, and in the shadow of a medieval castle and the Byzantine monastery of St George of Skyros. Beyond the capital there’s a wonderful, long, sandy beach at Magazia and several beaches along the west coast at Atsitsa.

Despite the variety and beauty of its terrain, Skyros is not a destination of mass-tourism, with large hotels and busy beaches. However, independent and sophisticated visitors will find one of the most interesting and relaxing holiday destinations in the Aegean. One may even see one of the small, Skyrian ponies which are unique to the island and have been bred here since ancient times.

18/04/2008

(GNA)

Rhodes is the biggest of the Dodecanese islands. It boasts a beautiful natural environment - much of its surface (40%) is covered by forests, such as the Valley of Butterflies - a veritable feast for the eyes in spring. Rhodes offers a variety of long, beautiful beaches, some less frequented than others, affording more privacy. The island is also rich with significant monuments. In the medieval old town, one can see the high-walled Castle of the Knights of Saint John and the palace of Grand Magister. One may also visit the municipal art gallery, which exhibits a remarkable collection of 20th century works. Furthermore, the Acropolis of Lindos is a must-see, a very imposing, awe-inspiring archaeological site that dates back to the Neolithic Age. 

Agrotravel: Rhodes the grand lady of the Dodecanese; Municipality of Rhodes: www.rhodes.gr

02/04/2008

(GNA)

For those interesting in discovering a lesser-known area in Greece, one can visit Zagori in Pindos mountains in the historic area of Epirus, northern Greece, where beautiful villages and traditional settlements are surrounded by gorges, caves and steep mountains. 

As Roberta Avery (The Star, 15.3.2008: Zagoria: a place that time forgot) puts it: “Few English-speaking tourists reach the Villages of Zagoria, one of Europe's best-kept secrets. This mountainous area is the Greece of quaint mountain villages and stunning scenery. In Zagoria you can visit the Vikos-Aoos National Park, which covers an area of 126 square kilometres and boasts the Vikos Gorge, the deepest gorge in the world -in proportion to its width,- according to the Guinness Book of Records.”

Agrotravel directories: Paths in Greece & Mountain Areas; The Vikos gorge: A 180 degrees panorama. Photographer: Onno Zweers

Secretariat General of Information: World Media on Greece - Food, Wine and Travel

14/01/2008

(GNA)

Pelion mountain is an area of exceptional natural beauty harmoniously blending lush mountain landscapes with azure seascapes all year round.

The Mouressi area (www.dimosmouresiou.gr) in northeastern Pelion represents an ideal escape from the drudgery of urban life. Staying in exquisitely beautiful natural surroundings, you can explore Pelion’s many peaks and hidden valleys, experience nature changing colours from deep forest green to emerald, turquoise and pure white, and refresh yourselves with a dip in the Aegean waters at any of stunning beaches, whose beauty are well known worldwide.

Kissos is a small village located about two km off the main road at a respectable altitude from which it looks on to the Aegean Sea. The forest all around is dense and in some cases impenetrable. The beauty of the landscape is breathtaking and the views unforgettable.

At the central square stands the three-aisled basilica of Saint Marina, one of the most important Christian monuments on Mount Pelion. Saint Marina is renowned for its history and delightful décor, the high points of which are the exquisite frescos, the four interior domes as well as many Byzantine icons.. The church also has a small museum inside where the visitor can admire old manuscripts and books as well as several hagiographic exhibits.

27/12/2007

(GNA)

THRACIAN POPULAR CULTURE

The Ethnological Museum of Thrace (www.emthrace.org) has won admiration for the way it operates, and its constantly expanding collections. It presents the social and economic life of Thrace, Northern Greece, from the 18th century to the 1970s by means of objects, words, images, video and sounds. The organisation’s objective is to function as a living cell in the Thracian land, associating tradition, its memory and knowledge with the current social issues, apart from acquainting visitors with the particular identity of the region. The aim is not to conserve folklore, but to create a lively means of getting to know the popular culture and customs of Thrace that will link tradition and memory to the issues of contemporary life.

ekathimerini.com: Ethnological Museum of Thrace - Linking memory, tradition and contemporary concerns; Explore more: Agrotravel.gr - The Official Information Gate to Greek Rural Tourism

30/11/2007

(GNA)

Perched on the cliffs of Santorini island in a villa, Atlantis Bookstore (www.atlantisbooks.org)  is run by an international collective of artists and writers. They organize readings, theatre sessions and open-air screenings.

Though not a moneymaking enterprise - the staff rotates throughout the year and lives in the bookshop - Atlantis Books is getting international praise. Jeremy Mercer, a writer for the Guardian, listed Atlantis Books as one of his 10 favourite bookstores in the world. [See also: New York Times - Travel, Oia, Greece: Atlantis Books]

22/11/2007

(GNA)

On Horseback 

Lefkos Pigassos (www.white-pegasus.com), a company based in the village of Papigo, one of the 46 villages of Zagorochoria, offers visitors the chance to get acquainted with some of the most beautiful regions of Epirus, Northern Greece, through organized horseback expeditions. Papigo is located at the heart of the National Park of the Northern Pindos Mountain range. It can serve as a starting point for horseback exploration trips to one of the most beautiful parts of Pindos, including Drakolimni Lake.

22/11/2007

Therapeutic Holidays Center

The Therapeutic Holidays Center is a pioneering, charitable organization on the island of Crete. For over thirteen years, it has been offering holidays combined with an extensive range of healing programs and activities for people with various disabilities, regardless of age.

Enjoy bird watching tours in some of Greece's 13 National Parks, 10 Ramsar Wetlands, 239 "Natura 2000" sites and 196 Bird Areas.

If you want to extend your bird list and get pleasure from rare Mediteranean species, Mesologi Lagoons, an immense Ramsar Protected Area of 15.000 hectares, offer a unique birdwatching experience.

Bird watching tours in Greece: www.greecebirdtours.gr

Hellenic Ornithological Society: www.ornithologiki.gr

11/09/2007

TRAVELLING THROUGH SCIENCE 

Travelling through space and time, exploring oceans and active volcanoes, sightseeing around the planet billions of years ago, as well as other interactive experiences that bring science closer to society are available in research centres and museums all over Greece. Initiatives to communicate research and science to a wider public are increasing, in number and variety, in Greece and the other European countries.

Some important scientific attractions that Greeks can enjoy are the GAIA Centre for Environmental Research and Education at the Goulandris Natural History Museum (www.gnhm.grwww.cretaquarium.gr).), the Digital Planetarium at the Eugenides Foundation (www.eugenfound.edu.gr), "Tholos" the new dome-shaped Virtual Reality "Theatre" of the Foundation of the Hellenic World (www.tholos254.gr), the Thessaloniki Science Centre and Technology Museum NOESIS (www.tmth.edu.gr) and the CretAquarium Thalassocosmos in Crete (www.cretaquarium.gr).

07/09/2007

Sites Tour by Text Message 

Guided tours of archaeological sites by text message is one of the projects put forward by the new administration of the Archaeological Receipts Fund (ARF), aiming to bring in more visitors and revenues. ARF submitted a proposal to accept an offer by a mobile telephony company to run a pilot programme, according to which passers-by will receive text messages when they are near or in the archaeological sites, telling them the name of the site and offering more details. The pilot project will feature sites such as the Temple of Olympian Zeus, the Panathenaic Stadium, the Odeon of Herodes Atticus and the Ancient Agora. 

30/07/2007

"Petites perles en mer Egée"

 

EXPLORING GREECE 

"Around Greece in 80 Stays, Hotels and guesthouses of character:" A writer’s journey around Greece, which  helps discerning travellers discover unique places at the most exceptional sites the country has to offer. Jacoline Vinke and Andre Bakker discover 80 small hotels and guesthouses in Greece and reveal their uniqueness through text and images. Around Greece in 80 Stayswill appeal equally to those interested in discovering the best of Greece, away from mass tourism, as well as to those with an eye for aesthetics and beauty.  

Great Small Hotels Network: www.yourgreece.gr

 

JEWELS IN THE CROWN 

Although unspoiled by mass tourism, Sikinos is not a forgotten island. On the contrary, it has opted for an alternative development. It offers few, small beaches, while in the town of Hora, local architecture is exemplarily preserved. For transport, cars are not fit for Sikinos, so one must try donkeys, or just hiking. Last but not least, the residents of Sikinos contribute to the island’s magic: an active community, which has revived the old vineyards, has set up a beekeeping cooperative and even operates a recycling programme. 

Kathimerini Daily: Sikinos opts for  a different way to develop 

 

JEWELS IN THE CROWN 

Aegina, an island full of natural beauties and great history, lies at the Saronic Gulf, in close proximity to the port of Piraeus. Having served as the first capital of Greece (1827-1829), it houses several buildings of major importance in the evolution of the modern Greek state, such as the Government House and the Orphanage, which was the premises of the first archaeological museum, the first national printing house, and the first Greek school of music.  

The time travel continues with the ancient temple of Aphaea, built in the northern part of the island in an area covered with pine trees, overlooking the sea. Under the proper weather conditions, the visitor has visual access to both Poseidon's temple in Sounio and the Acropolis, the 3 temples forming an equilateral triangle. Furthermore, a visit to the Monastery of St Nektarios, where the latest Saint of the Greek Orthodox church (1961) used to live, is recommended. 

All in all, Aegina is the case for relaxing holidays and an ideal destination for one/two-day trips, given its 40-50 minutes distance to Piraeus. Its sandy beaches and fish taverns will leave non unsatisfied, whereas its famous pistachio is a treat one should not deprive himself of.  

 

JEWELS IN THE CROWN 

The island of Naxos is the largest and the most fertile in the Cyclades group of islands. Its numerous sandy beaches make it an ideal holiday place for people who seek a quiet and beautiful are for their vacation. More than 64 villages, most of which are mountainous, cover its slopes. They are well known for their cool climate and their delicious local cuisine. Sport and nature lovers should not miss the walking tour in the fertile Tragea plains, where one sees Byzantine chapels, Venetian residence towers and picturesque villages. The Naxos Festival at the Bazeos Tower, (21/07 to 2/09) guarantees a rich cultural life during vacation. Don’t miss the exhibition “From Cycladic figurines to the aerosculptures of the future”. At nights, as you relax by the sea, definitely try the excellent citron liqueur, produced at Khalki village. 

 

JEWELS IN THE CROWN 

Rhodes is the biggest of the Dodecanese islands. It boasts a beautiful natural environment - much of its surface (40%) is covered by forests, such as the Valley of Butterflies - a veritable feast for the eyes in spring. Rhodes offers a variety of long, beautiful beaches, some less frequented than others, affording more privacy. The island is also rich with significant monuments.  In the medieval old town, one can see the high-walled Castle of the Knights of Saint John and the palace of Grand Magister. One may also visit the municipal art gallery, which exhibits a remarkable collection of 20th century works. Furthermore, the Acropolis of Lindos is a must-see, a very imposing, awe-inspiring archaeological site that dates back to the Neolithic Age.

 

Agrotravel: Rhodes the grand lady of the Dodecanese

The Municipality of Rhodes: www.rhodes.gr

 

JEWELS IN THE CROWN 

Rhodes is the biggest and the most breath-taking island of the Dodecanese. Rhodes boasts a beautiful natural environment -most of its surface (40%) is covered by forests. Especially the Valley of Butterflies is a feast for the eyes in spring. As regards swimming, the island offers a wide choice of impressively long beaches, the majority of which are not crowded. Rhodes also features significant monuments for its sophisticated visitors.  In the splendid medieval old town, one may see the high-walled Castle of the Knights of Saint John and the palace of Grand Migister. One may also visit the municipal art gallery, which exhibits a remarkable collection of 20th century works. The acropolis of Lindos, a natural citadel, is a must-see, a very imposing, awe-inspiring archaeological site that dates back to the Neolithic Age. What is more, one can always enjoy a walk in the old town and stop for a coffee or for some fresh fish in the beautiful cafes and restaurants.

Municipality of Rhodes: www.rhodes.gr

Agrotravel: Rhodes the grand lady of the Dodecanese  

 

JEWELS IN THE CROWN 

Paros Island (www.paros-online.com), one of the largest of the Cyclades, has a lot to offer its visitors. Whether one prefers a quiet, peaceful holiday enjoying the beautiful nature and traditional Greek atmosphere, or one is more of a party type, the island provides endless possibilities. Paros features many beautiful sandy beaches; some are hidden, tiny little bays, enclosed by extraordinarily "sculptured" rocks ("Kolimbithres"), while others are long and wide. The typical countryside with its terraced hills and magnificent rock formations, endless vineyards, olive groves and fruit trees is overwhelming. In the spring, the island is completely green, with flowers growing everywhere. There also exists a large number of attractive villages in the traditional Cycladic style. Their glowing white houses along labyrinth-wise streets, decorated with arches, pretty balconies, Greek pottery, bright flowers and fragrant herbs can make the visitor discover one postcard theme after another. Moreover, the island is home to an incredible number of picturesque churches, chapels, monasteries, windmills and historical remains, some of which are of great historic significance.

Visit the website of the Municipality of Paros Island

 

JEWELS IN THE CROWN 

Skyros (www.inskyros.gr) lies in the Northern Aegean, the largest and most isolated of the Northern Sporades. The island is more or less divided into two halves. The fertile north, with its green, rolling hillsides and the barren, mountainous region in the south. The capital Skyros - Hora is built amphitheatrically on the slopes of a hill, and in the shadow of a medieval castle and the Byzantine monastery of St George of Skyros. Beyond the capital there’s a wonderful, long, sandy beach at Magazia and several beaches along the west coast at Atsitsa. 

Despite the variety and beauty of its terrain, Skyros is not a destination of mass-tourism, so one shouldn’t expect a large choice of hotels, discos and busy beach resorts. However, on this island, independent and sophisticated travelers will find one of the most interesting and relaxing holiday destinations in the Aegean. If one is lucky, one may get to see one of the small Skyrian ponies which are unique to the island and have been bred here since ancient times.

 

JEWELS IN THE CROWN 

Lemnos is a beautiful and unspoiled Greek island that offers many opportunities for relaxing and pleasant holidays. More than a hundred golden sandy beaches, crystal clear waters, volcanic landscape, and traditional settlements will charm the visitor. Lemnos boasts important archeological sites, the pre-hestoric Poliochni, Kaveria and Haephestos, as well as natural sites such as the lake Chortarolimni with its flock of migrant birds and the fish ponds of Gomatiand. Lemnos is also a water-sports lovers’ paradise because of the strong winds.

 

Its sought-after products, especially the limnian wine moschato,  honey and kalathaki its delicious cheese, will capture every gourmet traveller. Myrina, its capital, is a particularly picturesque small town with wonderful cobbled paths and red-tiled houses. For nature-lovers, the village of Kodopouli, with its two invaluable biotopes (lakes), is a must. 

Agrotravel: Set sail for the Homeric windy island of Lemnos!

 

A Window to the Mediterranean  

Since last year, Greece has been home to one of the most impressive aquariums in the Mediterranean. The CretAquarium Thalassocosmos, the Hellenic Centre for Marine Research's technological and scientific marvel in Heraklion, Crete, has been open to the public from July 2006. It houses approximately 2,500 marine organisms which visitors can look at from special observation points, whereas the use of remote-controlled cameras can further enjoy the experience. A visit to the CretAquarium offers everyone an unparalleled window to the waters of the Mediterranean. 

CORDIS Research & Innovation Spotlights: CretAquarium Thalassocosmos: a window to the Mediterranean

CretAquarium: www.cretaquarium.gr 

 

JEWELS IN THE CROWN 

Rhodes is the biggest of the Dodecanese islands. It boasts a beautiful natural environment - much of its surface (40%) is covered by forests, such as the Valley of Butterflies - a veritable feast for the eyes in spring. Rhodes offers a variety of long, beautiful beaches, some less frequented than others, affording more privacy. The island is also rich with significant monuments.  In the medieval old town, one can see the high-walled Castle of the Knights of Saint John and the palace of Grand Magister. One may also visit the municipal art gallery, which exhibits a remarkable collection of 20th century works. Furthermore, the Acropolis of Lindos is a must-see, a very imposing, awe-inspiring archaeological site that dates back to the Neolithic Age.

 

Agrotravel: Rhodes the grand lady of the Dodecanese

The Municipality of Rhodes: www.rhodes.gr

 

Visit Greece

A new “Yahoo! Travel UK” Visit Greece on line guide is now available: uk.visitgreece.travel.yahoo.net

 

 

EXPLORING GREECE 

Enjoy bird watching tours in some of Greece's 13 National Parks, 9 Ramsar Wetlands, 239 "Natura 2000" sites and 196 Bird Areas. 

Hellenic Ornithological Society: www.ornithologiki.gr

Bird watching tours in Greece: www.greecebirdtours.gr

 

 

Cycling Adventures 

Greek landscapes, dominated by mountains and the sea, with over 4,000 km. of coastline in the mainland alone, constitute ideal bike destinations. The rider can discover wild and beautiful nature, friendly locals, and historical sights.  

Proposed destinations include Mounts Parnitha near Athens, Parnassos, Mainalon in the Peloponnese, Olympus and Pindus and the islands of Evia, Lesvos, and Crete. The option of coast-to-coast cycling is always available for beginners. Athletes can race at the Thasos Cup on the island of Thasos. 

More info: www.Bikegreece.com

www.cyclegreece.gr 

 

GREEK LAKE DISTRICTS 

Whilst Greece is mostly known for its wonderful seaside, it also has remarkable places near lakes. 

Start off in one of the most beautiful wetland areas in Europe: Prespes. Two lakes covering thousands of hectares and situated high up at an altitude of over 800 meters are a paradise for nature-lovers. Next stop Kastoria: a historic town, built on a peninsula in the beautiful lake Orestiada, surrounded by mountains, a different experience altogether! Further east stop in Edessa, to see the waterfall park in the middle of the town. Final destination: the Lake Kerkininestled between two separate mountain ranges, one of the few examples of a man-made intervention that has become a great ecological success. It now serves as a safe haven for 227 species of birds and is a paradise for bird-watchers. 

Places to Stay: www.yourgreece.gr

 

Randonnée

TREKKING IN NORTHERN GREECE 

Greece is a walker’s paradise and many trekkers come to Greece in the off-season to hike the mountain trails and ancient roads and paths on the islands and the mainland. The 12-kilometer Vikos Gorge lies in the Pindos Mountains in the historic area of Epirus, northern Greece. The Vikos to Monodendri route starts from Vikos, a settlement which literally hangs on the Vikos gorge offering a view of unmatched beauty. The route leads down to the Voidomatis River and its springs, through a built mule track. 

Agrotravel directories: Paths in Greece

 

Mer Egée

WEB SURFING IN THE AEGEAN SEA

A new website dedicated to the history and culture of Aegean Sea since Prehistory up to date is presented at the web address www.egeonet.gr. The portal has been designed by the Foundation of the Hellenic World.

Île de Lesvos

The island of Lesvos is renowned for its traditional products and cuisine. Its food is very sophisticated, perhaps because of the abundance of fish, livestock and olive oil, which is famous throughout Greece and Europe for its excellent quality. One may try local honey, cheeses and famous Kalloni gulf sardines. Lesvos also produces some of Greece’s best known ouzo. In Plomari, which, according to Matt Barrett’s travel guide, is the capital of ouzo, one could visit the Ouzo Museum.

Agrotravel: Prefecture of Lesvos

Matt Barrett Travel Guide: Lesvos

 


page précédente

 

Envoyez un courrier électronique à grinfoamb.paris@wanadoo.fr pour toute question 

ou remarque concernant ce site Web 

Copyright ©Ambassade de Grèce - Bureau de Presse et de Communication, Paris, 1999

Conception : Georges Bounas - Réalisation : Marie Schoina

Dernière modification : 11/02/2015